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  1. #1
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    DEVELOPING OLD EXPOSED FILM

    Hi all. I'm just new here. Nice to meet you all.

    I have a few rolls of 35mm colour film which has been shot but never developed (took loads of films about 5 years ago with a new camera and just stored the films away in a cool dry place...and forgot!).

    A few questions then
    1) Will the films be worth developing or will they be totally useless?
    2) If they are ok, are there any special techniques to revive them as best as possible?..I'm thinking temperatures/development times etc.

    I have a developing tank but have only ever developed B&W before so any specific pointers would be useful.

    Many thanks!

    p.s apologies for the block capitals in the title..I forgot!
    Last edited by dufusmaxima; 04-04-2010 at 04:48 PM. Reason: p.s



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    Quote Originally Posted by dufusmaxima View Post
    Hi all. I'm just new here. Nice to meet you all.

    I have a few rolls of 35mm colour film which has been shot but never developed (took loads of films about 5 years ago with a new camera and just stored the films away in a cool dry place...and forgot!).

    A few questions then
    1) Will the films be worth developing or will they be totally useless?
    2) If they are ok, are there any special techniques to revive them as best as possible?..I'm thinking temperatures/development times etc.

    I have a developing tank but have only ever developed B&W before so any specific pointers would be useful.

    Many thanks!

    p.s apologies for the block capitals in the title..I forgot!
    You just never know...sometimes they'll come out fine, sometimes bad, and every so often you might get some really cool "effects" from them.
    I'd get them developed, just for the heck of it..Forest Gump say's: "old film is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you'll get"

    J.
    "...the problem with socialisim is that, eventually, you run out of other peoples money to spend" - Margaret Thatcher

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbylake View Post
    You just never know...sometimes they'll come out fine, sometimes bad, and every so often you might get some really cool "effects" from them.
    I'd get them developed, just for the heck of it..Forest Gump say's: "old film is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you'll get"

    J.
    I will then...is there really no special way of treating them like temperature/time or is it, as you say, totally random?

    thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dufusmaxima View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jbylake View Post
    You just never know...sometimes they'll come out fine, sometimes bad, and every so often you might get some really cool "effects" from them.
    I'd get them developed, just for the heck of it..Forest Gump say's: "old film is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you'll get"

    J.
    I will then...is there really no special way of treating them like temperature/time or is it, as you say, totally random?

    thanks!
    I don't know if there is any work around, as the "old" film might act differently from one section to another section of the film roll. Someone here might have a suggestion. I think If I was developing the film, I'd just stick with the process formula that you're using. I guess you might contact the suppliers of your chemicals, and ask them if they have any opinions/ideas or special knowledge concerning this.

    J.
    "...the problem with socialisim is that, eventually, you run out of other peoples money to spend" - Margaret Thatcher

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    I heard that before the Kodak processing center shutdowns, some were developing Kodachrome from way back. Obviously, the process is different, but this could be an indication.

    I don't know how the film turns out though
    I own and operate How to Develop Film, what I like to consider to be the web's premier source on film developing

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    The best result would probably be obtained developing them B&W. There are companies who specialize in this type of work and that's what you get. Black and white. If the images are important to you maybe these guys would be worth a look. 'Taint cheap or fast so you've been warned. I've never done this so I'm just passing on what I've seen. Post up the results if you do it please.

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    thats the fun part. to see what the images look like.
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    I just sent out a roll (Efke KB 50) that has been fully exposed for at least 2 years.
    It's been in the fridge the whole time though (I doubt it's even expired anyway).

    Since it's been in the fridge the whole time, I'm not really expecting any weird results. Hell, I can't even remember what's on it (pretty sure there's some star trails though), so I guess I can't really complain with whatever I get.

    I would go ahead and have it developed. Since you stored it in a cool dry place, I would think it will be fine. I hope so anyway - for both of us, lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinCrabtree View Post
    The best result would probably be obtained developing them B&W. There are companies who specialize in this type of work and that's what you get. Black and white. If the images are important to you maybe these guys would be worth a look. 'Taint cheap or fast so you've been warned. I've never done this so I'm just passing on what I've seen. Post up the results if you do it please.
    Cool site - definitely will be getting bookmarked.

    From the FAQ there:
    Frequently Asked Questions :: Film Rescue International
    I have a film past it's expiry date or process before date. Do I need your services?

    As a rule of thumb...

    • Color film that is less than 5 years past its best before date and has been stored in excessive heat: you should be able to drop off any local photo finishers with a good reputation and get at least some OK prints.
    • Color film 5 to 10 years beyond the "process before" date that has not been stored in excessive heat: if it is important to you, then send it to us. If you are simply curious what is on the film, normal processing will likely give you fully recognizable though possibly poor quality images.
    • B&W film in cassettes (126/35mm) approximately 20 years beyond its "process before" date would best be sent to us or someone with an understanding of how to process a film to its highest possible contrast.
    • B&W roll film (120/620) approximately 30 years beyond its "process before" date would best be sent to us or someone with an understanding of how to process a film to its highest possible contrast.
    • Color film that has been in excessive heat over an extended period (i.e. a film left in a car parked outside for an entire summer season): if it is important to you, then send it to us. If you are simply curious what is on the film, normal processing will likely give you recognizable though poor quality images.

 

 

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