Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    TPF Noob!
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    21
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    0 times

    Question How to figure out the correct markup for prints?

    I just recently joined Mpix Pro ( I heard was one of the best, their welcome package does impress) and I have their pricing sheet for the base cost. I was curious I have tried to google this to no avail; what do I charge? I am at this place where I am booking about 3-4 sessions a month (started by business about 6 months ago) and I want to offer printing options for extra versatility. I know you can say "mark up what you feel is right" the only thing is I wanna be in line with the market. I do not want to undercut other photographers or overcharge and turn off my clients. Any advice would be appreciated.



  2. #2
    I am Big, I am Mike Site Moderator
    TPF Supporter

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    33,417
    My Gallery
    (111)
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Liked
    1654 times
    This question was asked yesterday or the day before...search around, there are some good answers in there (not to mention the many, many posts about this over the years). Also 'What should I charge' is one of the most popular questions on any photo related forum...so Google should give you plenty of reading, provided you search it thoroughly.

    To really answer this for yourself, you need to figure out your business plan. As part of that, you should decide how you want to structure the way you charge for what you do. For example, you might charge $500 for a sitting fee, and then not need a whole lot of markup on your print sales. On the other hand, you might charge $20 for a sitting fee....and then need an 800% market from your 'cost of goods sold'.

    Either way, you should really try to figure out all of your costs...not just the cost of the prints (goods sold), but how much did your gear cost? What about computer equipment that you used? Did you drive to the location or do you have a studio space (in home or not)? What about photographic education...including the time you spend practicing etc? Marketing? Don't forget taxes, business license, insurance etc.
    These are things that need to be covered if you want a sustainable business. Not to mention making money for yourself.
    Of course, it's unlikely that you'll be able to cover those costs with only 3-4 sessions a month (although if you could, that would be fantastic). So in your business plan, you should decide how many sessions you can do, how many you want to do and how many you'll need to do, in order to reach your goals.
    All of this should help you to figure out where your pricing should probably fall.

    One way to get this started, or to help find a starting point...would be to search around your area and see what other photographers are charging.

  3. #3
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    1,798
    My Gallery
    (16)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    171 times
    I use 3x if that helps.

  4. #4
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    3,578
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Liked
    300 times
    Like bennielou, i charge 5 X for the small prints up to 12X18, and 3X for the big ones.

  5. #5
    No longer a newbie, moving up!
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Mesa, AZ
    Posts
    66
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    2 times
    In our neck of the woods, we tell our clients 3x for smaller prints, and 2x for larger canvas prints, or framed/matted pieces. But, that works in our local market. Your market may be different.

    A good place to put yourself is more expensive than 25% of your competition, and cheaper than 75% of the competition. Nobody wants to order from the cheapest place around, because they probably assume that there's a (bad) reason that they're so cheap. But, in this economy, everyone is looking for good deals wherever they can find them. By not being the cheapest, you don't have to worry about losing business from people avoiding the bottom of the barrel, but you're also going to be considered a real bargain compared to most of your higher priced competitors. Assuming this system works along-side what you have to pay for your prints, it always seems to work well for our clients.

    If you have additional questions about pricing structure, or starting up your business, please feel free to contact me for more in-depth information. Our business specializes in assisting start-up artists and photographers get their business off the ground.
    John Gilman
    "Faville Photo"
    (623) 204-7516
    http://www.favillephoto.com
    Your photos on canvas!

  6. #6
    KmH
    KmH is offline
    Helping photographers learn to fish
    TPF Supporter

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    33,486
    My Gallery
    (1)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    3887 times
    Smaller prints usually require a larger markup than big wall prints, because the smaller prints make up the bulk of your sales.

    I markup desk size prints 3000% (for example an Mpix 8x10 is $1.99 (my cost) and retails for $60). From there my markup diminishes as print size increases, until at 24x36 I'm down to a 700% print markup. Larger than 24x36 gets priced on an individual basis. Framing and other products require a differnt pricing structure.

    Another approach is to charge by the square inch. To pick a number out of the air for illustration purposes lets use $0.40 per square inch.
    An 8x10 is 80 square inches and at $0.40 per would be $32. A 24x36 is 864 sq in and would cost $345.

    Plus your pricing strategy has to consider your business goals. Three to 4 sessions a month seems to indicate a part-time business. If at some point you were to want to expand that to 3 to 4 sessions a week, you would likely need a different pricing strategy to attract the additional customers.
    . . . . . . Keith . . . . . . .How Do I Use My Digital SLR?...
    A lot of people go through life doing things badly. Racings important to men who do it well. When youre racing, it... its life. Anything that happens before or after... is just waiting. - Michael Delaney

  7. #7
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Atwater, CA
    Posts
    1,301
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Liked
    44 times
    Quote Originally Posted by KmH View Post
    Smaller prints usually require a larger markup than big wall prints, because the smaller prints make up the bulk of your sales.

    I markup desk size prints 3000% (for example an Mpix 8x10 is $1.99 (my cost) and retails for $60). From there my markup diminishes as print size increases, until at 24x36 I'm down to a 700% print markup. Larger than 24x36 gets priced on an individual basis. Framing and other products require a differnt pricing structure.

    Another approach is to charge by the square inch. To pick a number out of the air for illustration purposes lets use $0.40 per square inch.
    An 8x10 is 80 square inches and at $0.40 per would be $32. A 24x36 is 864 sq in and would cost $345.


    Plus your pricing strategy has to consider your business goals. Three to 4 sessions a month seems to indicate a part-time business. If at some point you were to want to expand that to 3 to 4 sessions a week, you would likely need a different pricing strategy to attract the additional customers.
    That's what I do.

 

 

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. How much of a markup for framed prints?
    By CraniumDesigns in forum General Shop Talk
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-21-2010, 08:24 AM
  2. CMYK prints vs light printer chemical prints
    By kkamin in forum Beyond the Basics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-25-2009, 07:38 AM
  3. New Action Figure shot-I bet you've never seen a figure like this one ;)
    By Hooligan Dan in forum Commercial/Product photography
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-07-2008, 04:51 PM
  4. Markup on Cameras anyone know?
    By eravedesigns in forum Photographic Discussions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-12-2008, 04:57 AM
  5. Equipment markup
    By jlykins in forum General Shop Talk
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-25-2008, 02:10 PM

Search tags for this page

average markup on photo prints

,
how much more should photographers charge for canvas prints
,

how much to mark up photography prints

,

how much to mark up prints

,

how to figure out a mark up for photograph

,

markup on photography prints headshots

,
retail mark up on 8x10 order digital prints online
,

what is a fair mark up on photos?

Click on a term to search for related topics.

Tags for this Thread