Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    No longer a newbie, moving up!
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    29
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    0 times

    Dealing with white glare from intense backgrounds

    Hi All,
    Besides avoiding it all together what is the proper technique for toning down say a bright window in the background of your picture? The object of the picture is dramatically darkened by an overexposed backgound such as a window with bright sunlight coming through.

    Thanks in advance (first post)
    Keith Baran


    My Photos @:
    http://flickr.com/photos/keith_baran/



  2. #2
    I spend too much of my life on TPF!
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Waterloo, ON
    Posts
    264
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    7 times
    You can use a flash to fill in the subject against the window. Trying to expose more will just wash out the window. Your camera might have a setting for fill flash, or just pop it up and try it with different settings.
    Nikon D300 - A few lenses - A couple of kids - A Mortgage etc.
    http://www.brilliantimages.ca rich12@me.com

  3. #3
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,312
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    1 times
    Try using flash
    I'm the reason you can't trust what you read on the Internet

    D300 . Nikkor 24-70 2.8 . Nikkor 70-200vr 2.8 . Nikkor50 1.8 . Sigma105 2.8 . Tokina12-24 4

  4. #4
    I am Big, I am Mike Site Moderator
    TPF Supporter

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Edmonton
    Posts
    33,446
    My Gallery
    (111)
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Liked
    1661 times
    The object of the picture is dramatically darkened by an overexposed background such as a window with bright sunlight coming through.
    It's all about how you meter the scene.

    Firstly, there is always a range involved with photography. We call it the dynamic range. Basically, this means that we can't expose for very bright areas and very dark areas at the same time. If you set the exposure for the darker areas, the bright areas (highlights) will be blown out (white) and have no detail. If you set your exposure for the bright areas, then the dark areas will be black shadows.

    Now, the problem is that the camera doesn't know what your subject is. All it knows are the light levels that are in the scene. So if you have a bight window in the scene, the camera's meter might think that it's an overall bright scene, and it will expose for that....which leaves your subject underexposed.

    What you can do, is ensure that the camera is not taking the window into account when deciding the exposure value. You can do this by taking a reading off of the person, rather than the whole scene. Check your manual for how to lock the exposure, it's probably as easy as half pressing the shutter release button.

    This will give you a well exposed subject and a really bright window...which is probably better than a somewhat bright window and a shadowy subject.

    Now, if you don't want the window to be blown out, then you can try to even out the exposure. One way to do this, as mentioned, would be to use the flash to light up the subject. It may take some tinkering to get the balance between flash and ambient just right, so practice when you can.

  5. #5
    No longer a newbie, moving up!
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    29
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    0 times
    Thanks for the responses. Mike, that is definitely the answer. After I posted that message I was reading about metering and my ops manual explained about locking the exposure. I just grabbed my camera and tried it! Even though it was just a shot off the hip of a ban saw on a work bench by a bright window the result was like a, night and day
    Thanks again
    Keith Baran


    My Photos @:
    http://flickr.com/photos/keith_baran/

 

 

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. how do I get crisp white backgrounds?
    By Foxtrot_01 in forum Photography Beginners' Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-26-2010, 09:51 AM
  2. White Balance and avoiding glare
    By padrepaul77 in forum Beyond the Basics
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-07-2009, 04:33 PM
  3. Super white backgrounds
    By i Kandi Photography in forum Beyond the Basics
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-27-2009, 10:20 AM
  4. Black and White Portrait Backgrounds
    By rp1600 in forum Beyond the Basics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-09-2006, 02:22 PM
  5. I can't keep my backgrounds white!
    By Scurra in forum Beyond the Basics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-11-2005, 03:22 PM

Search tags for this page

how to avoid glare with window im background of pic
,

how to prevent back ground glare in photo

,

how to take a picture with background glare

,

metering portrait with window glare

,
photography dealing with window glare
,

photography white glare

,

white background glare

,

white glare in photos

Click on a term to search for related topics.