Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: Water spots

  1. #1
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times

    Water spots

    _MG_5115-01.JPG There are few water spots. Is the image sensor dirty?
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking



  2. #2
    KmH
    KmH is offline
    Helping photographers learn to fish
    TPF Supporter

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    33,784
    My Gallery
    (1)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    4017 times
    If you want to check for a dirty image sensor, set the lens to a small aperture like f/16.
    Take a photo of a light colored wall section that is just wall, or take a photo of a patch of blue sky since f/16 won't let in much light if you're inside.

    But yes. It looks like you have some dust bunnies on the image sensor.
    . . . . . . Keith . . . . . . .How Do I Use My Digital SLR?...

    * * * * * * * * * * A photograph is a roughly approximate 2-D interpretation of a 3-D reality. * * * * * * * * * *

  3. #3
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times
    Is there a way to clean the image sensor or do I need to send it to the professional to do cleaning?
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking

  4. #4
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Southern Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    2,561
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Liked
    252 times
    Quote Originally Posted by tecboy View Post
    Is there a way to clean the image sensor or do I need to send it to the professional to do cleaning?
    Cleaning your sensor is relatively easy and a lot cheaper than sending it to a professional. There a variety of ways to clean your sensor, depending on how much dust is on it. If there is very little dust on it then simply blowing the dust away with a hand-held blower like the Giotto Rocket - Giottos Rocket Air Blower - (Large) 7.5" AA1900 B&H Photo is a place to start. If the dust is more stubborn, then you may need to go to something like the Arctic Butterfly - Arctic Butterfly sensor brush. Sensor cleaning, remove dust. , or use swabs as shown here - Sensor cleaning swab. . A detailed approach can be found here - Digital Camera Sensor Cleaning .

    Cleaning your sensor is not that difficult and you get better at it the more times you do - this doesn't mean that you should do it every day, or every week, just that the first couple of times may take you a little longer because you are still learning about the process. I do my own sensor cleaning and I have the Giotto Rocket, and a Visible Dust kit that includes the Arctic Butterfly and a set of swabs and cleaning fluids - all their products can be seen here - Camera sensor cleaning ? Arctic Butterfly sensor brush, loupe, swabs, liquids . There are others and I am sure that if you Google "sensor cleaning", you will find enough information to keep you going for weeks. Your camera manual should have some instructions about the process for cleaning your sensor. I would advise you to read these at least 3 times, just to make sure that you understand them. HTH.

    ____________
    WesternGuy
    LINYBIMMER likes this.
    Landscape photography is the supreme test of the photographer - and often the supreme disappointment. - Ansel Adams
    My Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/westernguy/
    My new blog: http://photowestguy.wordpress.com/

  5. #5
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times
    I got it clean. Thanks
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking

  6. #6
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Dearborn, MI
    Posts
    2,047
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    953 times
    The sensor is protected by a filter in front of it. So you don't actually touch the "sensor" itself. It's not that fragile... just don't rough it up so much that if there's anything that you could scratch you end up dragging the abrasive offending bit all over the filter and scratching it.

    I go through progressions to clean my sensors.

    (1) easiest is to just remote the lens, point the camera at the ground, then force a self-cleaning. If there's a bit of dust on it then it may just fall off and out of the camera body.

    (2) I hand blower (rubber bulb) can give a few puffs of air and that'll usually clear the sensor if the self-cleaning cycle didn't work. Avoid cans of compressed air. If can spit fluid. Also if you blast too much air the rapidly decompressing gas has a freezing effect and that can just attract water condensation ... then you get water spots.

    (3) if that doesn't work I have a very soft brush and a few gentle swipes might just take off the offending bits of dirt.

    (4) if that doesn't work I INSPECT the sensor using a magnifier to see what's on the sensor that won't just fall off, won't blow off, and won't swipe off with a soft brush. I have a LensPen sensor cleaning and I also have Eclipse cleaning solution and PecPads or SensorSwabs (a few drops of Eclipse on the swaps or pads and a gentle swipe across the surface will generally do a perfect job cleaning it.

    When swapping lenses, tilt the camera downward to avoid debris falling into the sensor body.
    Last edited by TCampbell; 06-16-2012 at 12:13 AM.

  7. #7
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times
    Good tips. Thanks
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking

  8. #8
    Been spending a lot of time on here!
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    197
    My Gallery
    (0)
    Liked
    12 times
    Also I have started to make it a habit to change lenses when my camera is pointed down, I believe this can also keep some dust out especially indoors. My camera is still only a few weeks old but I so far I have no dust inside it. Also the lens pen has a sensor cleaning end on it, but I would always try the air bulb or the sensor cleaning inside the camera before ever resorting to touching the sensor itself.

  9. #9
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times
    I use the sensor cleaning swabs more than twice and still get dusts in the image sensor. Is the image sensor far too dirty that I need to take to the professional to clean it?
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking

  10. #10
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times
    I just found out I have to apply a little force on the sensor swap to wipe out the dusts. According to my manual, it says the image sensor is very delicate just like the focusing screen, and using a brush can scratches the sensor. It did not say anything about the filter layer that protects the image sensor. I have Canon EOS Rebel T3i. So which is it? Do I have a filter that protect the sensor, or is it okay to use other cleaning material than using sensor swabs?
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking

  11. #11
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Dearborn, MI
    Posts
    2,047
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    953 times
    Your T3i has TWO filters in front of the sensor. The first filter (the one closest to the front of the camera) is a low pass filter which also acts as the piezoelectric filter (it vibrates when a charge is applied -- that vibration is what causes dust to (hopefully) fall off the sensor. so when you see the camera flash the message that it's doing a sensor cleaning (either when you switch it on or off) that's actually referring to the piezoelectric filter). Behind that, there's an IR-Cut filter which blocks infrared light. Behind that is the actual imaging sensor.

    If there was a piece of sand on the sensor and you were to drag it around with a swap (pressing hard) you could theoretically put a scratch on the sensor. This is why you should treat it gently.
    Tim Campbell

  12. #12
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Chiswick, London, UK
    Posts
    1,597
    My Gallery
    (52)
    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Liked
    373 times
    I never used anything other than a good blast with a rocket blower. Any remaining tiny dust particles can be removed in post. It would have to be positively Dalmatian before I would try cleaning it myself or paying someone else to do it. Maybe I'm just a tight arse!



  13. #13
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times
    I have a dump question. Let's say I'm stupid enough to the scratch the image sensor with a toothpick, and take my camera for a repair. Does the repair technician replaces the actual image sensor and the filters, or just replaces the first filter only?
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking

  14. #14
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,179
    My Gallery
    (0)
    Liked
    108 times
    Quote Originally Posted by tecboy View Post
    I have a dump question. Let's say I'm stupid enough to the scratch the image sensor with a toothpick, and take my camera for a repair. Does the repair technician replaces the actual image sensor and the filters, or just replaces the first filter only?
    Well its a computer chip.

    Basically a piece of extremely pure silicium with just some micrometers of something else on it.

    In short, you dont want to scratch that.
    Nikon D600 + AF-S 28mm+50mm f1.8 + AF-S 16-35mm+70-200mm f4 VR

  15. #15
    TPF Junkie!
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Jose, Cali, The Heart of Silicon Valley
    Posts
    1,587
    My Gallery
    (0)
    My Photos Are OK to Edit
    Liked
    169 times
    I called the camera repair shop, and they said they only replace the whole image sensor including the filters.

    I just a bit worry that I might scratch the sensor and would be a nightmare to spend a lot of money to replace it.
    Flickr
    Canon 70D

    "I've been tracking a tear in the fabric of space time which combined with airborne pieces of metal at Builders Barn to create a miniature black hole. This anomaly interposed itself between Homer and Bart causing a gravitational lens which absorbed the light reflected from Ray the roofer." -Stephen Hawking

 

 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Ads

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. How to remove Water Spots?
    By Queen of Spades in forum Photography Beginners' Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-10-2010, 12:46 PM
  2. I got spots...
    By Deadeye008 in forum Photography Equipment & Products
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-09-2007, 12:32 PM
  3. Water spots/Fingerprints.
    By gender bombs in forum The Darkroom
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-02-2006, 08:21 AM
  4. water spots
    By Holly in forum General Gallery
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 12-13-2005, 06:11 PM
  5. My Spots on The Web
    By JEgbert in forum Personal and Professional Photography Websites
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-28-2005, 11:53 PM

Search tags for this page

how to clean water spots on a sensor t3 canon
,
how to fix light spot on a picture
,
how to remove a dirty lense spot on a picture
,
making a picture a water spot
,
sensor scratch
,
water spot in my lens cannon t3i
,

water spot on my lens of canon t3i

,
water spots on canon camera sensor
Click on a term to search for related topics.