2 Questions...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ajmall, May 24, 2004.

  1. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    Compared with the UK, are cameras and equipment cheaper in Tokyo?

    and my current dilemma- film scanner (around £500) or Dig SLR (closer to £1000)???? i'm a student and slowly becoming a freelance photographer.

    thanks
     
  2. Skittles

    Skittles TPF Noob!

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    I can't help you with the first question, but maybe I can help with the second. Not so much a recommendation, though, as information to help you make your decision.

    I currently use slide film for all of my photos, then scan them with a film scanner. Using an obsolete Nikon LS-1000 film scanner and Silverfast SE scanning software, I can archive my slides in much higher resolutions than can be achieved with any digital camera now available. The scanner is rated for 2700 dpi, and the Silverfast software can actually extend that to 5400 dpi. In most cases, I am scanning a bit more than the entire slide image, then cropping down to 3600x2400 pixels. However, I could double that using the software. When my budget allows, I will be getting a Konica-Minolta Dimage Scan Elite 5400, (as well as the Silverfast AI software for this model,) which can scan up to 5400 dpi without third party software.

    I own a Canon EOS film camera, and expect to add a Canon digital camera to my tools because of lens interchangability, so I am familiar with the specs on the digital cameras from Canon.

    The Canon 1Ds, professional Digital SLR, is rated for 11.1 MegaPixels. Costing between $7,000.00-8,000.00 USD for just the body, the maximum image size is 2704x4064 pixels. The Canon 1D Mark II, also a professional DSLR, is rated for 8.2 MegaPixels and has a maximum image size of 2336x3504 pixels. The 1D Mark II runs $3,100.00 to $4500.00 USD for the camera body.

    The lower end Canon Rebel DSLR camera body is closer to $1,000.00 USD, and has a maximum image size of 2048x3072.

    The Canon Digital SLR cameras have the 3:2 ratio of 35mm film. This is probably true of other digital SLR cameras. The lesser expensive "point and shoot" consumer digital cameras use the 4:3 ratio of most computer monitors, and probably aren't really suitable for what you need.

    If the higher resolutions are important, you will probably want to seriously consider using a film camera and a dedicated film scanner. As you can see from the above examples, it can be quite costly to get a digital camera with any kind of high resolution capabilities.

    If you do decide on a film camera, I also recommend you shoot with slide film for full color images. Slides are much easier to scan. Negatives require film specific color correction, and will take more of your time to scan and process.

    Using film, scanned images will need to be cleaned up to remove scanner noise, dust, lint, and (some times) scratches. To get really good scanned images requires a professional film scanner. Even then, I would have to recommend getting the third party software from Silverfast.

    (If you are looking to buy a scanner, I would recommend you go to the Silverfast website and verify that the scanner brand and model is supported by Silverfast before purchasing the scanner, as their software is scanner specific.)

    There are times when a film camera will produce better results for the situation, and times with a digital camera is the better choice. Consequently, I would recommend that whichever way you go, you purchase a camera you can use for many years.

    I hope this information will help you make your decision.

    -Skittles
     
  3. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    wow thats cool thanks. very helpful.

    i think will just go for a film scanner at present, a dig slr is more of a want than a need right now as its convenient and looks the **** (excuse my french...).
     

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