30 rules

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by KmH, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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  2. c.cloudwalker

    c.cloudwalker TPF Noob!

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    Rules, rules, rules.

    All waiting to be broken.
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    But, you need to know the rules, and have a valid reason for breaking one. ;)
     
  4. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    thanks, some interesting items to think about
     
  5. LokiZ

    LokiZ TPF Noob!

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    I see a few issues with a number of these rules. Still some really make sense.

    I also see what seems to be an underlying theme of business taking priority over family. If this is your bag I suggest you stay single as it would not be right to make your passion that of your entire family's. (nor would we want that as they would probably want to use our gear all the time ;) )

    I do not believe a successful photographer is incapable of having a wholesome and good family life. I just believe that those who truly do have a good thing going with their family do not hold some of these rules to be true.

    This is just my opinion for what is worth, no biggie. Despite my belief that family comes first, my corporation and those around me hold me in high standings as one of the more flexible persons employed.

    Do not take this the wrong way I think there are some very good ideas in the link, I really do. I just think that for example:

    "Having the best tools" is better served with the addition of "that you can afford. If you can't afford the best tools, get tools which will get the job done for you that fit your budget." The truth is you cannot always afford all you want or even need. If you are not flexible that is another way to fail.

    There are others examples I could point out too, but it can all be summed up by keep a harness on your passion and know when it's ok to unleash it and know when it's not.

    Again there is a lot of good information in there but as usual I still have to agree with Cloudwalkers post.

    Cheers!
     
  6. Antithesis

    Antithesis No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I think there are some cool and inspirational ideas, but not all of them. Some of them carry with some of the most productive advice I've ever received. I.e. don't let others fear, doubt or negative feelings bring you down. Move past those people if you have to, or disinclude them from your passion. I've realized that negativity towards others just makes you look like an a**hole and does little else. Being able to critique ones work is good. Tearing it apart is not. My last employer was one of the most negative people towards his competitors, and it gave me a lot of ugly habits.

    Also, getting the best gear you can afford is probably better advice. Having the absolute best stuff for your niche is nice, but skimping somewhere else in your life so you can have slightly nicer tools might not be a good idea. I've also come to realize that there are numerous tools that can be used for one job, but the most important is your brain. A fancy new camera body is useless if you don't know how to use it, and almost as importantly, process your images properly. Some of my favorite images I've ever made came off the cheapest (digital) camera body I've owned. I've actually started developing a less-is-more mentality. Why spend $10,000 of your profit on a new tool, when $1,000 will suffice?
     

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