[35mm] Color print films with greatest contrast range.

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by 5th, Jan 29, 2004.

  1. 5th

    5th TPF Noob!

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    Hello All,

    Its been a long time since i had to get technical in the photography sense so my brain is a little filled with webs from the past.

    I am trying to determine the rule of thumb if you will about films with a large contrast range vs. their relative sensitivity to light (speed). Also, I am seeking a color print film with the greatest contrast range that most accurately represents the colors as they were seen (and not hyper-saturated or altered in hue).

    Anyone have any ideas where to begin?

    BTW, to me a film with the lowest contrast range would be one that like a B&W film that can only show 'black' and 'white' and not grays. So, I am looking for the opposite, one that can represent the greatest number of increments between black and white for all color channels.
     
  2. Kent Frost

    Kent Frost TPF Noob!

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    When I worked at the local store, there was a color film that Konica made that was ISO 50....it was a magnificent and vibrant color film. Unfortunately, within about 6 months before I stopped working there, the film was discontinued. That was in 2001, I believe. Oddly enough, I believe you can still find this film on ebay...although if it was discontinued that long ago, I would question the capability of a roll of film that old. I'm sure that the colors have probably shifted by now....unless of course it's been properly refrigerated.

    It's been so long since I've shot much film, so now I'm not sure what's out that would compete with it, with the exception of Kodak Royal Gold 100. But once again, it's been long enough for me that I wonder whether or not THAT is even available any longer!
     
  3. dlc

    dlc TPF Noob!

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    Your films designated UC or VC have enhanced color(pro films). Slide film, try Velvia 50 or 100. Agfa UC is currently the most saturated film on the market.
     
  4. 5th

    5th TPF Noob!

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    Why are you folks reccomending these films? I am looking for films with a large contrast range, not artificial colors. Either I am misinterpreting your replies, or someone else is misinterpreting my post.
     
  5. wwjoeld

    wwjoeld TPF Noob!

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    im not big on film but most of these people are talkking about saturation, and what 5th wants is contrast, can anyone help him out
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    General rule of thumb:

    BW neg films: largest contrast range, easily manipulted in darkroom

    Color negs films: medium contrast range

    Slide film: lowest contrast range


    None of this really matters though compared to your lighting. Lighting will have the greatest influence on the contrast of your final images. Color accuracy is also going to have a lot to do with your lighting.

    You can go to film manufacturers' websites and download the results of their labs' tests that will go into great detail about these very things you are asking. Then when you get out into the real world, you'll find it's not lit anything like the Kodak/Fuji/Konica/Ilford lab.

    And if you are having prints made contrast and color will be affected by paper and process choices. Results from the same equipment and materials will also vary from lab to lab.

    Only extensive personal testing will you be able to determine what film will work best for whatever it is you are trying to do.
     
  7. 5th

    5th TPF Noob!

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    Lighting? Non-existent!

    Application:

    Capture what is being projected onto a projection screen in a room with very, very little ambient light. I expect tripod/timer for exposures up to 30-seconds if necessary.
     
  8. jack

    jack TPF Noob!

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    hi 5th

    when i read ksmattfish i thought yeah "time of day" would be a big element.
    then i read your proposed concept. will the dimly-lit room actually feature
    in-shot, or just onto the projected screen, close-up?
     
  9. drlynn

    drlynn TPF Noob!

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    Jack is right. If your shots are going to include only the lit screen, then your exposure times shouldn't be overly long. If you can manage a tripod, then by all means use one with a slower film.
    But for color print film, the best contrast range you can expect is about 4-4.5 stops Good b&w will stretch into the 5+ range.
     
  10. 5th

    5th TPF Noob!

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    Film Frame is 3:2, and contained within this is the projection screen's 4:3 frame using maximum width. This will leave areas outside of the projection screen area at the top/bottom of the film frame.

    Additionally, when an HDTV (ATSC) image is projected on the screen, the 16:9 image is contained within the 4:3 area of the screen, using the maximum width of the screen. Again, there will be portions of the screen (above/below) that are outside of the 16:9 area and within the 4:3 area of the screen (and also within the 3:2 area of the film frame).

    If I use a DVD player (instead of HDTV), I will typically be viewing projected image formats from 1.85 to 2.35 on the 4:3 screen. Same analogy as the HDTV but the areas without a projected image are larger.

    It would be important that I correctly expose for the projected image area, as this is what I see with my eyes, but I am concerned I also represent the area outside the projected image so as to represent what I am also seeing there.
     

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