35mm speeds?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by greasemonkey, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. greasemonkey

    greasemonkey TPF Noob!

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    Howdy, I am some what of a tradilist and am still shooting in 35mm black and white (t-max, but triX is alright too). I am starting to get into shooting later at night (between 10-2 or 3 in the morning) and am looking for a higher speed film, but am unable to find it at any of the local stores. Does anybody know what options I have, and where I can get the film?
     
  2. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    By higher speed film, do you mean a high ISO film suitable for hand-holding without flash, or a low ISO film for tripod work?

    T-Max 3200 is a very interesting film for low light photography, but is very very grainy. Ilford make excellent low ISO fine grain B&W films. As for where to buy them, a photographic specialist or the internet (B&H) perhaps?

    Rob
     
  3. greasemonkey

    greasemonkey TPF Noob!

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    Well, typically I use 400 ISO (T-max). If I want to shoot in darker conditions, I would want a higher speed film, which would be more sensitive to light, right? I do have a tripod but its not the best, and it works but thats all it does.

    I'll have to check out B&H, thanks!
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    You can either lengthen the exposure - i.e. use a tripod, or you can up the ISO. Bear in mind that increasing the sensitivity of the film will increase the grain. I like TMax3200, but it is VERY grainy.

    Rob
     
  5. bigfatbadger

    bigfatbadger TPF Noob!

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  6. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Try B&H and Freestyle, too - both linked from here by clicking on the banner ads at top & bottom of the page. In addition to a faster film, use the fastest lens you have, as well. A lot of times just having that combination, with a tripod, will be enough for low light conditions.
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    There is Kodak Tmax P3200, Ilford Delta 3200, and Fuji 1600. None of these are actually as fast as the label says; they are all closer to ISO 800, but they are designed to be pushed. My results with all three have been fairly coarse grain; for some subjects it works, but usually I prefer something a little finer. There are all sorts of ways to get more speed out of most of the ISO 400 films too. I'm a big fan of Tri-X 400 at ISO 1250 developed in Diafine.

    ISO 3200 is only 3 stops faster than ISO 400. Depending on the lighting conditions you are encountering you may still want to use a tripod. If your exposure is 1 sec at ISO 400, you'll only get up to 1/8th sec at ISO 3200.
     
  8. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    I am a big fan of Fuji Neopan 1600. I haven't tried any other high-speed films, but I know I really like this one (as well as the 400ISO version).

    The best thing to use for shots late at night is a tripod, though. Even 1600 speed will be hard to use handheld outside in the middle of the night.
     
  9. hammy

    hammy TPF Noob!

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    For night photography you'll need to pull out the tripod, guaranteed.
     
  10. greasemonkey

    greasemonkey TPF Noob!

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    Like what sort of ways?

    Thanks everybody, it looks like I'll have to stick with my tripod...
     

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