50mm F1/4 ..Is It For Me ???

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Glorsclaws, Jan 21, 2006.

  1. Glorsclaws

    Glorsclaws TPF Noob!

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    I think I have decided on what lens to get with my new DSLR...but as a nervous noob I thought I would run it by here before I leave in about an hour.
    Im getting the Canon 5D & have decided to start out with the 50mm F 1/4 lens.
    I take pics of nail art/hands mainly and want get into portraits...do you guys think this is the right lens to be staring out with?
    Any last minute advice would be gratefully appreciated.
     
  2. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If you don't really want it, I'd happily take it !!! ;)
     
  3. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Is it the right camera to be starting out with, is the question. You really want to spend over $3000 on a camera, if you are a "nervous noob"? Why not look at a 350D, and save yourself a LOT of money. Get the 50mm f/1.8 and save even more money.

    That's my advice.
     
  4. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The 50mm f1.4 is a very nice lens. Very sharp, well built and pleasant bokeh. Its "cousin", the 50mm f1.8, also produces nice results at a fraction of the cost ($60-$90). Something to consider.....

    I'm no expert in nail art and how it is photographed but I'm guessing you might be better off getting a macro lens of some sort. The Canon 100mm f2.8 USM Macro might better serve you for producing pictures of objects up close. The same lens is also known to be an excellent lens for portraits.
     
  5. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I'm also in agreement... A 5D is a pretty darn expensive camera for a self proclaimed "noob". If portraits and nail art is your focus, your money is best spent on lenses and lighting. Perhaps a ring light flash to go with the macro lens I recommended? Don't get fooled into spending the big bucks on a high count megapixel camera.... there's a lot more to be considered.
     
  6. Glorsclaws

    Glorsclaws TPF Noob!

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    Hi thanx for the advice so far guys.
    Ive been supplying pics to a nail art bizz for a year now, their buisness is growing & so is my interest in photography. My pics are used in the nail art product catalogue & its now being suggested that we do some posters & maybe next year a 'How to' book. Im excited because this is coinciding with my interest in photography.
    Ive been on some shoots as the model as well as the artist but all Ive ever wanted to do was get behind the camera.
    The 5D is being bought as a combined Chrimbo/Birthday present...I reckoned as it was being offered...why not! I figured Ill grow into it where I couldnt see myself affording to upgrade to it any time soon.
    Id thought take the camera, learn as I go & add the glass as my needs grow...so you guys thinks this is not such a cool idea?
     
  7. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    The 5D is full frame, so the 50mm will be a "normal" lens on it. It will see things very close to how the eye sees them. You won't be able to get very close to the nails, so you might have trouble filling the frame with the hands. Even on a 350D it will be similar to a 80mm, which is still probably not going to do it. As said above, a macro lens would probably be a good choice. It would allow you to get close to the nails so you can actually see what's on them.

    What are you using now to take the pictures?
     
  8. ShutteredEye

    ShutteredEye TPF Noob!

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    I do think that's way too much camera for you. Tell you what I'll do, I'll trade you straight up for my 350D, I'll even toss the 50mm 1.8 in for free.

    I'll just pm you my address......


    If the camera was a gift, I wouldn't turn it down. It's a really nice camera, and may be more difficult to learn on given its target audience is the already seasoned pro. I'm sure you'll be able to muddle through.

    The 50mm 1.4/1.8s are great lenses for portraits. But as recommended above I'd get a 100 2.8 macro in addition.

    Or, if the camera hasn't been bought yet, maybe a rebel 350d or 20d + more really nice glass could be an alternative too.
     
  9. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I agree with the others as far as a camera goes. If you are worrying about needing to upgrade and don't want to go with the 350D, I'd get the 20D. I have the 10D which I bought to replace my EOS5 and A2e. Those are considered to be just into the pro level, and I found the 10D to be almost a direct replacement. The only thing I had to get used to was the crop factor.

    I'd love to get the 5D, but I certainly don't need it. The 10D is serving me well and will continue to do so. The 20D is a camera you can own for years and years and not need to upgrade. Other than the full-frame sensor, the difference between the 5D and the 20D is going to be something only a hard-core photographer is going to notice.

    Do you really need:
    50 ISO, or will going down to 100 ISO be fine?
    0.3 EV steps instead of +/-1.0
    96% frame coverage in the viewfinder instead of 95%
    interchangable focus screens

    These are things that some pros would be interested in, but for most of us, they are just parameters we work within.
     
  10. Glorsclaws

    Glorsclaws TPF Noob!

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    Thanx again for the advice, Ill do a bit more research/reading before going ahead with the purchase.
    Mark, Ive been using my G5 for taking the pics, these are a couple of old ones but they give an idea of what I do.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2012
  11. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    Very cool!

    Yeah, you'd need a macro for that second shot. You might have trouble with the 50mm on a 5D for the first, but it should be okay on a 350D or 20D. Another lens to consider would be the 85mm 1.8. Another wonderful lens. You could use the price difference to get both lenses.

    Because of the construction of the G5, you can get in close like the second pic. You can't do that with most SLR lenses. They have to be made as a macro lens.

    I'd go to a shop and try the various combos out before you decide.
     
  12. 'Daniel'

    'Daniel' TPF Noob!

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    i don't think any camera is too big or complicated to get. It just takes a bit of time and effort. If you learn on a harder camera then you will find easier ones simple.

    Run before you can walk and then walking is just easy running.
     

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