5D questions: better lens choices?

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by vreynaud, Mar 10, 2008.

  1. vreynaud

    vreynaud TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    1st: I am new but I appreciate reading all the input & opinions from you (guys & girls)

    I am upgrading to a real digi camera, more likely the 5D: my reasoning:
    for my use I need the widest image I can get (I shoot interiors) so:
    2. a cropped (40d) already handicaps me so a full frame will be wider, correct?
    3. what would be the best wide lens: sigma 10-20? or ?
    will the slower stop be another handicap?

    for other lenses: I do want a telephoto zoom as I travel & often find myself needing it: I am looking at the
    4. sigma 50-500 and the
    5. canon EF100-400 is (will that work on the 5d?)
    any of these 2 above are not optimum for everyday use (size & weight)
    is there a better choice or should each lens have its purpose and I should not try to compromise by wanting a lens to do too many things

    Knowing I will get the wide lens and eventually the telephoto (for this summer) is there an all around good lens for "everyday use" maybe one that comes with the kit? either the 28-70 or the 18-55

    lots of questions but I would rather ask than make the mistake
     
  2. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    In essence yes. A 10mm lens is still 10mm no matter the film plane size but a cropped body like the 40D will have a cropped viewing area. For wide angle shots, a full frame camera is ideal.

    According to Sigma's website the 10-20mm zoom is a "DC" lens which means that it is designed for camera's with a cropped sensor. It won't work with the 5D full frame or traditional 35mm film cameras.

    The widest zoom sigma makes in the "DG" line is the 12-24mm.

    IMO, shooting interiors is not a time sensitive subject. You'll have time to compose and move around. Hence, you should be considering primes over a ultra wide angle zoom. Take a look at the 14mm f2.8L, 20mm f2.8, and 24mm primes from Canon. Sigma has a few as well in 20mm and 24mm. For interiors you'll want a wide angle lens that controls distortion fairly well which is not as well controlled in zoom equivalents.

    I have the 100-400mm and really like its results and flexibility. Others have commented on the price/value and range of the 50-500mm although I don't have experience with it. Size and weight for everyday use is a subjective personal choice... can't really answer. For me, I couldn't see myself carrying the 100-400mm everywhere I go on a daily basis which is why I have an alternate camera system (smaller/lighter) for that purpose.

    Again the 18-55mm is an EFS lens and not compatible with full frame cameras including the 5D. Two good walk around lenses are 24-105L and the 28-135 IS. Some will also throw in the 24-70L but I think it is too short, bulky, and heavy to be considered an everyday walk around lens.
     
  3. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    btw.. welcome to the forum.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,817
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Welcome to the forum.

    The 5D is certainly a great camera. The full frame sensor makes for great image quality.

    Yes, a cropped sensor (40D etc.) will handicap you on the wide end. However, 10mm on a cropped body may be wide enough for you, in which case, you could save a lot of money with a 40D instead of the 5D.

    You can't use a lens like the Sigma 10-20mm (or Canon 10-22mm) on the 5D because the are designed specifically for cropped sensor bodies.

    However, you get the same wide view on a 5D with 16mm as you do on a 40D with 10mm. So if you go with the 5D, you could get the 17-40mm F4 L or the 16-35 F2.8 L and still get a wide view.

    I would suggest going into a camera store and trying that out. You may find that a 40D with the 10-22mm is a better option than a 5D and a 16 or 17mm lens.

    Also, keep in mind that the crop is a benefit at the long end.

    I don't know a lot about the Sigma 50-500mm. That's the one they call the 'Bigma' isn't it? I believe it has pretty good image quality, considering that it's a 10X zoom....but it is big and heavy.

    The Canon 100-400 L IS is a great lens for wildlife or long distance landscape etc. The IS is great on this lens and the image quality is very good. It is also very big and heavy though. I wouldn't classify either of these as good walk-around lenses...they are just too big and heavy.

    You haven't given us a budget...so it's hard to pick out an 'all around' lens. On a 5D, a 24-105 F4 L IS, would be a good choice. The 28-135 IS, would be a cheaper alternative...or maybe a 24-70 F2.8 (from either Canon or Sigma/Tamron).

    On a 40D, a good all around lens would be the 17-55 F2.8 IS (well, that's the best one, but expensive). The 17-85 IS would be good...also, something like the Tamron 17-50 F2.8 would be good.

    The 18-55mm 'kit' lens is a decent starting point for people with a crop body and a tight budget, but if you can afford better, skip this one.
     
  5. vreynaud

    vreynaud TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    For the interiors, my time is actually limited as they are production sets which once lit the window of opportunity to shoot the set is very small.
    Wider is better, I can always crop it in photoshop, hopefully with minimal distortion.

    With the fact that I will not have time to set up a tri pod, should I be concerned with a slow lens or are they all (safe) fast enough?

    I will take your advises & go look at the wides (including primes) as well as the "walk around lenses".

    Thanks for the help
     
  6. vreynaud

    vreynaud TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    My main objective being shooting interiors (sets) I need all the "width" I can get, but again as suggested I will go see the difference & evaluate what is best suited for my needs

    Thanks for the input

    if anyone has been in the same situation/needs I would like to hear your findings
     

Share This Page