A good array of lenses?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by LaserSailor, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. LaserSailor

    LaserSailor TPF Noob!

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    So far I have a Nikon 18-75mm zoom lens and a Tamron 75-300 zoon lens. I'm wondering what, if any, other lenses should I consider buying?

    I'm looking for the capability to do a wide array of shots in many different enviroments. I've already decided against a "super-tele" 500mm+ for the time being. I am thinking about a fish-eye lens but I'm afraid that the novelty of the fish-eye perspective might wear off rather quickly.

    I'm not looking to make any purchases soon, but am rather gathering intel on what a pro-photo kit should include, lens wise.

    I think my next buy should be a fixed 50mm standard lens, I've heard that fixed lenses give better picture quality than zoom lenses, can anyone confirm?
     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If your looking to invest in lenses then this is my advice.

    1) you don't collect lenses and then find uses, you find uses and then get lenses to fit those uses. A lens has to have a use and a purpose for you getting it otherwise you will find yourself not using it. So when you find a subject area that you are interested in that your current kit will not or limits your ability to take pictures of, then research for a lens

    2) get the best you can - lenses make a massive difference in image quality that you get and high end ones also keep their value for a long time. Investing in good pro end glass is definatly expensive, but its most certainly worth it (IMO)

    As for the primes vs zooms - for a given price and quality range a prime will nearly always beat a zoom for optical quality. There are some fantasticly sharp zooms on the market now which are well worth considering (like the 70-200mm zooms) but even they can't hold up to the image quality of a prime lens. Also prime lenses tend to have small f numbers (larger max apertures) which helps them work in lower light conditions.
     
  3. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    50mm is an excellent choice, it won't just give you better quality, it will shoot in low light FAR better then your current lenses.

    From there you just have to decide what is important to you:

    Macro?
    Wide Angle?
    Telephoto?
    Low Light?
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Top quality 'fast' lenses. Ideally you will want lenses that will last you a long time...that you will not want to replace with something better. For zoom lenses, get them with max apertures of F2.8. You might also want to consider whether you will upgrade to a full frame camera someday, in which case, you will probably want to stick with full coverage lenses (not DX lenses).

    For example, if you are building a good lens kit...you will probably want to upgrade both your 18-75mm and 75-300mm lenses to something better.

    So in the long run, it's probably better to avoid low or mid level lenses because you will want to upgrade them at some point.
     

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