A, P and ISO handling question... :)

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by giorgio, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. giorgio

    giorgio TPF Noob!

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    Hi there

    Last time when I was practicing at Downtown...
    Taking pictures on outdoors I decided to use A priority because...
    - I saw the Speeds chosen by the camera were over 1/125
    - Not possible to use tripod

    But, when I entered a Church, shutter speed got down to 1/20 and so.
    So we could said I had to increase ISO...

    So, I was wondering, if when good light, using A priority seems the efficient way to go, particularely in my case, outdoor candids, city scenes etc.
    Which one would be in low light conditions?

    How about this...
    I saw my Camera has Auto ISO, and I think a read something about it...

    Would using S priority and Auto ISO be the efficient setup to use?

    You see, instead of "guessing" a good ISO, I would have the camera set to S 1/60, and the camera will also get the just about enough ISO for the Speed and Aperture, so instead of me setting ISO up to 600.. the camera will use automatically like 525

    And, because handheld is a must, I could move around taking pictures and the camera will take care of the optimal ISO.

    So, we could say, improving those pictures a bit more, would require external aids like, Flash, tripods,... or just another body that handles more and better ISO.

    Is this a correct aproach?
    What would be your indoors handheld, no Flash, technique?


    Giorgio
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2010
  2. AfroKen

    AfroKen TPF Noob!

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    Giorgio, it's a good approach. I'm not sure what a correct approach is...well, it's one that elicits good photos. :D

    I set one of my cameras to automatically adjust the ISO, as you do, but put a "ceiling" of 1600 so it doesn't go any higher because my camera gets really grainy at 3200. This seems to work well for low-light situations in which I want to shoot quickly.

    A lot of times, because I know the camera I'm using, I'll know what ISO setting I should shoot at, and will set it accordingly. That too is a good approach: experience with the camera.

    Anyway, I hope this helps somewhat!
     
  3. bigtwinky

    bigtwinky No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    i dont use auto iso as i find that the camera likes to up the iso when its not really needed or other adjustments can be made to increase the light. upping the iso is my last resort (usually).

    I almost always shoot in A (Av for Canon). Which means I control Aperture. Which one is best depends on what results you want. You are controling the Depth of Field.

    If you are getting slow shutter speeds at ISO 100 and Aperture of say f8, you either make the aperture bigger or up the ISO if you must keep that aperture.

    If you are at f2.8 and thats your max, ISO 100, and the shutter given is too slow, then up the ISO.

    When to use shutter speed? I dont. Others do. This is when you must have a certain shutter speed and you let the camera decide the aperture.
     
  4. Plato

    Plato TPF Noob!

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    With the Nikon D80, you can configure auto-ISO so that an ISO increase occurs only when the shutter speed drops to a value that you have defined.
     
  5. bigtwinky

    bigtwinky No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    thats a cool feature, thanks Plato!
     

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