About daylight studio

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by janicely226, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. janicely226

    janicely226 TPF Noob!

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    Hello. I am a beginner in photography and is doing a research on the usage of daylight in photography studio. I am very grateful if you guys can give me some advices.
    For studios that employ daylight, some may get the sun from side windows and some may get from skylight. Is there any distinctive difference between the two?
    For the dimension of studios, what sort of size is undesirable?
    Thanks a lot for you help.
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I believe it's necessary to distinguish between direct sunlight [warm color temperature and harsh shadows] and light from the sky [cool color temperature and soft shadows].

    As an aside, painters at one point in time tended toward large rooms with lots and lots of sky light from the north sky. A good example would be N.C. Wyeth's studio at Chadd's Ford south of Philadelphia in the Brandywine Valley. The room is huge, with very large windows on the north side. Large rooms permitted lots of light as well as the ability to handle very large canvasses.
     

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