Actually Using The Hasselblad 500C/M

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Dave Colangelo, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2012
    Messages:
    3,333
    Likes Received:
    1,427
    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    When I worked for a studio doing weddings (~30 years ago) I used a Hasselblad 500 C/M. I really enjoyed working with that camera. But in particular I enjoyed that I could enlarge prints quite aggressively and they'd still look fantastic (as compared to my 35mm SLR where you'd start to notice more softness if enlarging a print too much.)

    I noticed you have the focusing lever clamped so the lever is on the left. I put it on the right ... same side as the winder and shutter button. This let me quick-focus the camera with my right index finger & thumb operating the lever... and the 'ring' finger of my right hand was on the shutter button. It made very easy and efficient to focus and shoot -- my left hand was supporting the camera (my camera was on a flash-bracket with the flash about 2' above the lens to avoid red-eye ... which we couldn't digitally fix back on those days.)

    The stock winder was swapped for one that had a nicer crank.

    We also had the optional 45º pentaprism viewfinder ... which also had a built-in light meter -- rather than the stock finder.

    I love the shots and you're showing off the differences between the Ektar (punchy saturated colors) vs. Portra (moderately subdued color). We used to shoot with Kodak VPS (VPS = Vericolor Professional Type S) for the weddings because the moderately subdued/gentle color tones were particularly beautiful for wedding photography. Kodak no longer makes VPS... Portra is about as close as you can get to it.)

    As for developing your own B&W... I would encourage that. It can be difficult to learn to load the first roll of film in a dark bag and you can't see how you're doing. The tip I was given back when I learned ... just waste a roll on purpose. Take a roll you don't plan to shoot, and learn to wind it onto the spool in good lighting so you can see what you're doing. Practice that a few times. Then take the same roll and put it in the dark-bag and practice it a few more times so you get the feel for it without having to see it (and knowing you can open the bag if you're not sure it's working right).

    After just a handful of practice runs, you'll have the confidence to take an exposed roll (something you care about) and know you can comfortably wind it onto the spool without needing to see it.


     
  2. Dave Colangelo

    Dave Colangelo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2016
    Messages:
    300
    Likes Received:
    90
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I ended up going for the V800 and have been super happy I did. Although not all that often I do on occasion shoot 4x5 for a lot of the epson's that have only the center part backlit were not really an option. I had looked at some of the various others that are not flat bed as well but I shoot a bunch of formats so flat bed was the only real option. I also have been asked to help out on a size-able scanning/archival project which led to the purchase in the first place. Most of the more recent stuff I have posted was scanned at home and the results have been really nice. The dust is frustrating but since it costs me nothing but time I dont really mind it, the local labs charge somewhere in the range of $10 a scan for 4x5 negs and about the same for scans of a roll of film (if they do the processing) so its already been well worth it. If you are in the market I highly recomend it.
     
  3. Dave Colangelo

    Dave Colangelo No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2016
    Messages:
    300
    Likes Received:
    90
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit


    I have since removed the helper as I found it just got in the way. One of the main problems I always found with it is that the 80mm has about 340 degrees of rotation on the focus ring and if the little handle is not placed in a fairly specific orientation it hits the trigger button on rotation.

    I have since put this on as well

    I was lucky to find mine with the metered 45 prism, the un metered 45º and the chimney finder. Generally I keep the waist level on for portability and I really like the chimney finder for landscape work. One thing I dont love about the 45º finders is the lack of magnifier option that the waist level finder has.


    I wasted a few blank rolls on loading... As part of this whole endeavor I have also taken to dark room printing (my local lab dumped a lot of stuff and let me have it) so that has been quite a bit of fun as well. I have been sticking mostly to the ilford stuff and really been happy with the results but I would like to mess around with some of the other chemistry and film options. I have done a bit of Rodinal work with a buddy locally and have liked it as well. Eventually Ill get around to trying some of the kodak stuff more seriously.
     

Share This Page