Advice (Car pics)

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by Zach, Dec 16, 2006.

  1. Zach

    Zach TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hey, I'm Zach and I'm new to the whole photography thing. I took some pics of my '70 Chevelle with a Nikon E4600 digital camera. The 1st pic of my car is in the January '07 issue of the magazine Chevy High Performance. Let me know what you think, good or bad. Any general advice is appreciated, I don't have any specific questions yet. Thanks.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Azuth

    Azuth TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Sydney 'strailya
    The first picture is excellent, the car is positioned well, the warm light and the colours in the background make for a top shot. Though it does look like some quick cloning was done in the bottom left corner.

    The focus is off in the second shot and the angle just isn't working for it. In shot 1 the road is a lead in line to the image, in shot 2 the road really detracts from the car.

    The composition in the third shot doesn't work for me. It's probably the angle of the whole thing, it might have worked better with a shallower DOF, not sure.

    Nice car.
     
  3. Zach

    Zach TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks for the advice and complements. I'm new at this, what exactly does "quick cloning" and "shallower DOF" mean?
     
  4. Azuth

    Azuth TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Sydney 'strailya
    Cloning is taking one part of an image and using it to replace another part that you don't want. I might be wrong, but it appears that somebody has done this with the first image just to the left of the rear tyre in view.

    DOF is an abbreviation for "depth of field". This is a measure of how much of the image is in focus. You make it shallower to emphasise part of the image. This is generally about having a wider aperture. Google "Depth of Field" or search for it here and you should get a good description.
     
  5. Zach

    Zach TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Ok thanks, I see where you're talking about the "clone." That's actually an electrical box, for a subdivision that's going to be built there.
     
  6. Puscas

    Puscas TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    1,885
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY
    I agree with Azuth and my advice is: look at your framing. In the third picture, part of the front left tire is missing. If part of the car is not in the frame, it's usually for a reason (like you want to emphasize the left headlights in that last shot, right?, that's why the right side is 'missing'). But there's no reason to cut off a piece of the tire in that pic.

    Really great car btw!!




    pascal
     
  7. Zach

    Zach TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks for the advice, this really helps.
     
  8. becmaclean

    becmaclean TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2006
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    massachusetts
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Firstly, what a beautiful car (I'm jealous)

    Ok, as far as photo quality. The first shot is nice but, the lighting wasn't working for you and created alot of shadows on the body that I don't think are working for you. It's giving the body a wavy look that I'm sure is not the case. Compposition wise, it is great. I just probably would have used different lighting,

    The second shot seems a bit out of focus, especially the undercarriage area.

    Keep at it, you've got a gorgeous subject to work with:wink:
     
  9. ceecookie

    ceecookie TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Singapore
    It looks like a good Muscle car to me:thumbup:
     
  10. Zach

    Zach TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I was trying to focus on the main body line, it seperated the wavy looking part and the smoother part of the pic. What lighting would be more effective? This was at sunset. I've heard sunrise and sunset with the sun at your back is the best?
     
  11. becmaclean

    becmaclean TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2006
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    massachusetts
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Yes, shooting at sunset/sunrise normally does work best because you are avoiding the days' harshest lights. I'm wondering if perhaps you changed your camera angle in that same light, perhaps you would have gotten rid of those shadows. Also, what would have happened if you had shot the drivers side?? Either that or try shooting inside , if you have that capability.

    Also, a side thought, if you had taken this picture a bit higheryou could have included more of the hood (which I think is a desireable attribute). You also would have hidden the drivers side front tires' white wall. I know you flipped them to show black walls but, you don't want to show the white walls. The only reason you want to show the undercarriage is if you are showing off something worth looking at ie: chrome oil pan etc

    The picture I attached, from musclecar restorations, shows beautiful lines and notice barely any glare. While I like your background better, try maybe an overcast day??

    Once again a beautiful car:wink: [​IMG]
     
  12. Zach

    Zach TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks, I'll try that next time I go out.
     

Share This Page