After market battery for OM-D EM10 m2?

Discussion in 'Mirrorless Cameras' started by WhaleDaughter, Jun 22, 2017.

  1. WhaleDaughter

    WhaleDaughter No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I recently switched systems and upgraded from a Canon Rebel SL-1 to an Olympus OM-D EM10 mark 2. I am really loving my new little camera, and I'm hoping to do some serious shooting with it soon.

    However, I only have the 1 battery that came with the camera. I had 2 batteries with my SL-1 and really appreciated having a spare. I had one Canon battery and one off-brand, a Halcyon. I never had any problem with the off-brand battery in my Canon, but when I bought my OM-D the camera store guy and Olympus rep got in my head and now I'm worried about buying an off-brand battery for my new baby, but the Olympus batteries are a bit $$.

    Are off-brand batteries a valid concern? Are their brands that are more reliable than others? Any that should be avoided like the plague because they'll melt my camera then make it blow up? Or should I suck it up and save my dollars to buy an Olympus brand battery?


     
  2. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Understand that camera manufacturers don't make batteries. Battery companies do. If you can get one with a different name for less money that makes sense to me. I've done just fine with "off brand" batteries.
     
  3. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I personally would not buy third-party batteries. They are, more often than not, not up to proper specs and quality. I have quite a bit of knowledge with different batteries and battery chemistry's. Most third party batteries are B and C bin batteries hence why they are much cheaper. A bad battery can damage your camera and it would void your warranty. I definitely wouldn't use one in my >$2000 camera.
     
  4. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    While I haven't any knowledge of battery manufacturing, I have years of hands-on experience with third party batteries. I've used third party batteries in my Canon, Panasonic, Olympus and Fujifilm cameras. I haven't experience any negative effects from using third party batteries. For the past few years I've been using Wasabi batteries. In the case of most/all/many third party batteries, the non-OEM battery will charge in the OEM charger but the OEM battery will not charge in the non-OEM charger. I shoot mirrorless cameras and found that mirrorless seems to eat up battery life much quicker than my dSLRs. I recommend you acquire a handful of additional batteries regardless of their source.
     
  5. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Your lucky you never had a swollen battery stuck in your camera. It's not uncommon for this to happen. A friend of mine had it happen to his. He had to send the camera in and pay to have it removed they also voided the rest of his warranty. Also there are quite a few tests out there that shows the capacity for the third party batteries like Wasabi are a lot less than oem.

    If your willing to take a chance they can be an ok cheap alternative. Personally for all the money I spend on my equipment I'd rather pay the money to get proper oem batteries that are gauranteed up to specs then cheeping out and possibly hurting the camera or voiding the warranty.

    Like anything else you get what you pay for.
     
  6. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Not uncommon? I would have to say it is extremely rare since I haven't ever heard of it happening until your post. How many "on brand" batteries have done that? No comparison? Sorry, I view your post as misinformation at worst and overstated at best.
     
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  7. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I've never had a third party battery problem of any kind and I've purchased dozens of non-OEM batteries over the years. The third party batteries I've purchased seem to last longer than the OEM batteries.
     
  8. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Do your own research, I have done mine. I am just giving my opinion based on my research and many years of experience with third-party batteries of various chemistry. I know how third parties get their batteries and why they are significantly cheaper. I have experienced and seen catastrophic failures from cheap batteries, and not specifically with cameras, but a variety of electronics.

    Yes you can probably go your whole life not having an issue or you can experience multiple issues.

    Your choice whether to use them or not. I choose not.
     
  9. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    All batteries for cameras are 3rd party batteries. Camera makers do not make batteries, they are all outsourced. Often the only difference between the "OEM" and the "3rd Party" is that you pay 3 times more for the one with the OEM label than you do for the one without.

    As for my research, one of my Uncles was the VP for one of the largest US battery makers.
     
  10. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Obviously the camera makers don't make their own batteries. I think everybody understands we are taking oem and non-oem.

    Ask your uncle which bin the non-oem companies get their batteries from. It's not from the A bin.

    Also just this week Nikon issued a recall on a batch of batteries because of 7 incidences of short circuit and battery swelling. You will never see a recall from non-oem like Wasabi or Watson.
     
  11. table1349

    table1349 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    They have only one bin. The typical smart phone or camera battery costs around 2 to 4 dollars to produce a lithium ion battery. You ever pay 4 dollars for an Oem battery for you camera?
     
  12. BrentC

    BrentC Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    No they have A, B and C bins. A bin is top tier that meet all specs and are usually sold OEM. B and C bins are ones that don't meet up to certain spec requirements, for example, not meeting Amp, capacity or cycle rating. These are sold to companies that a) even though they don't meet the specs required the specs do meet the companies demand out of a battery. b) sold to companies that buy them cheap and rewrap under their own name.

    I have been involved in both hobbies and projects that require battery ratings to be accurate or their would be venting and depending on the chemistry of the battery that would result in a fiery meltdown or safe venting if safe chemistry battery was used.

    Also what people forget is also the circuitry that sits in front of the battery. I'd rather trust the Camera companies in getting it right for their cameras.

    So a lot of research by myself and others have gone into batteries, especially lithium-ion and what is offered by third-party/non-oem.

    I have spent thousands of dollars on my camera equipement I am not going to be worried about spending a little more for batteries.
     

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