Alright, I need a little help deciding on a new DSLR

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by RoffleWoffle, Jun 20, 2007.

  1. RoffleWoffle

    RoffleWoffle TPF Noob!

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    I have been wanting to buy a really nice DSLR to use for photojournalism and general photography during college. I would really love a 5d, but obviously, as a senior in high school, I can't afford to lay down that cash for a camera. I've narrowed it down to the Canon 30D and Nikon D200. I have about $500 or so invested in lenses for Canon, so not a horrible amount, but not nothing either. I love the Canon for it's ability to shoot higher ISO without a lot of noise, while I'm drawn to the Nikon for it's weather sealing and lighting fast shooting. There's a 2 MP difference between the two, but from what I've heard it will only make something like a 200x200 px difference.

    So, choices:

    Canon 30D ~$1000 I have a http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...3_50mm_f_2_5_Compact_Macro.html#goto_itemInfo and an old but reliable and sharp Canon 70-210mm already, but I may buy something along the lines of this: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...18_200mm_f_3_5_6_3_DC_Lens.html#goto_itemInfo


    Nikon D200 ~$1500 plus around $600 for a nice lens or two.

    Is the D200 really worth the extra $1000 that I would have to spend, or will I not really notice the difference?
     
  2. Zatodragon

    Zatodragon TPF Noob!

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    Well, if you do already have a nice canon lens, i'd still stick with canon. The 2 MP difference will also be very hard to notice. For you, i'd go with the canon. Me personally would get the D200 cause i really like Nikon's flash system as well as all time-lapse shooting, metering and focus controls right on the outside of the body, and the mirror up shooting mode that's wonderful for macro photography. But a lot of people don't use those options.
     
  3. EOS_JD

    EOS_JD TPF Noob!

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    If you already have Canon lenses, might be best to start there but I believe the D200 to be a better and more capable camera (although not a huge amount in it). Weather sealing (for your type of photography) would win it for me - but make sure if you go the Nikon route that you buy weather sealed lenses too......

    Difference in image size is small.
    D200 image size is 3872 x 2592.
    30D image size is 3504 x 2336
     
  4. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Have you listed in order of importance which features you will be needing for your intended field of photography?

    Being able to keep and use your lenses is tempting but the D200 is amazing to use in difficult, fast changing light. Almost as easy as using print film and letting the lab figure it out.

    The noise thing IMO is way over hyped for 98% of photography. If the shot was exposed properly you just won't see it on the print without a loupe, and you will never see it on anything printed in a newspaper.

    If you are one of those people who only use 'natural light' and don't want to spend the money on fast glass while still shooting weddings by candle light, get the Canon. Please under stand though that a photon is just a photon, it doesn't matter whether it came from the sun or a flashgun! Those from the sun contain more varying energy levels (different colors) than those from the flash but the flash can be gelled to mimic just about any light. And a flash doesn't set or climb to high noon.

    $.02

    mike
     
  5. RoffleWoffle

    RoffleWoffle TPF Noob!

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    I'm hearing pretty much what I have heard before. The differences are small, but at the same time, very noticeable/nice. If I were to get the D200 (which I am leaning towards), what lens(es) should I get. If I can afford it I'd like a standard 18-150or200 and a regular prime or macro prime. And if possible, weather sealed.

    As for the canon lenses, it's not a HUGE deal because I am still going to be shooting and developing my own film, so I can still use them with my EOS film.
     
  6. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I shoot the D200 and on a budget I'd get the 18-70mm and a 24/28mm f2.8. For most shots the 18-70 mm and a little thought/shoe leather will get you what you need. 27-105m equiv)

    For low light when you don't want to be noticed (I mean that you don't want the AF assist light to come on and scare the natives) you can set the 24/28mm to it's hyperfocal (at this focal range you get everything from about 12 feet to infinity acceptably in focus without having to play with the focus ring) and set the 200 to shutter priority/manual focus and fire away. No one is the wiser unless they hear the shutter click because you don't even have to bring the camera up to your eyes.

    You have a large range of lenses new and used to choose from with the D200 as it meters very well with all of them. (manual lenses are not automatic though) That's AI (or AI'd) on to the very latest.

    You can pick up the 18-70mm new or get it used for around $250 +/- and a 24mm I would think for under $150.

    Zooms can come later and are reasonable. ( you probably will want to concentrate on one lens at a time though)

    Good luck

    mike
     
  7. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I myself am a Nikon snob, so I will let you know where my loyalties are. Having said that, let me tell you a little story. In Feb '06 I was shooting my grandsons 6th birthday party at a local pizza eatery. They had only been open for about a week, and the entire staff was new. The server came over to replenish our drinks with a full 2 qt. pitcher of coke. You guessed it, my D1X with 14mm f/2.8 was on the table, resting on it's back and the lens pointing skyward. After the "event", coke was pooled on the lens element, held in by the lens hood. Ice covered the camera and the assembly was floating in a pool of caramel colored liquid. I snatched up the camera and proceeded to dry it off with napkins the staff provided. I went on shooting and the camera has never shown any sign of a problem. I really trust Nikon's weather proofing now more than ever.
     
  8. RoffleWoffle

    RoffleWoffle TPF Noob!

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  9. forzaF1

    forzaF1 Ultimate Ferrari Tifosi

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    I love my D200. The 5fps comes in handy a lot, so I would defintely go with the D200.
     
  10. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    At the risk of stirring something up again if you buy the D200 please do not buy an 18-200. Really if you can aford such a nice budy you should besmart enough to put great glass on it. I can think of much better places to put $750.

    Like to start with you can spend a little more and get this.
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/300490-USA/Nikon_2147_17_55mm_f_2_8G_ED_IF_AF_S.html
     
  11. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    LOL No, you have other things to do with your money just now.

    If you are on a tight budget (remember that you are eventually going to need a flash) check out used lenses. If B&H or KEH say that they are in good shape then they usually are. And good lenses last a long time. There should be a lot of 18-70mms out there because a lot of newbies buy them and then get on forums and listen to experts rant about kit lenses. (yes there are better lenses but the kit lenses -Nikon anyway- are very good for their intended use for beginners- people who aren't beginners don't buy them in the first place)

    This is not to say that the lens -guys- don't know what they are saying, it's just that they can oft-times spend more of your money than you are likely to have. (one thing all photographers seem to have in common is the ability to make do with what they have ;)) If you can't afford the best glass get what you can and take care of it because eventually you can sell it to fund what you really want.

    The 18-70 will have the gasketing but I don't know about the 24.

    One other thing about the extended warranty, the people who sell those things make a Lot of money. You might just be better off setting some money aside to have the camera repaired yourself and spend the rest on real insurance- talk to your family insurance agent about it!

    mike
     
  12. RoffleWoffle

    RoffleWoffle TPF Noob!

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    I hope you're kidding. Obviously quality glass is super important, but there's no way I'm spending more on ONE lens than on the entire body.
     

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