amateur digital photographer lost with 35mm, need tips

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by spookyu, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. spookyu

    spookyu TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Well, this may sound weird, but I'm something of an amateur digital photographer (I can't tell you how hours I've spent with my E-500 around my neck), and I'm looking to learn 35mm now. My grandfather gave me his old Nikkormat FTN, and I don't know why but the simplicity of the thing absolutely astounds me. After I cleaned it up and removed the very 60's era strap (amazing how the brown, floral design worked for everything from couches to straps for camera's back then) I realized there was still about half a roll in it so I spent the last 40 or so minutes playing with the different lenses, filters, and stuff just learning how that works. Now the problem is...well, I'm used to being able to SEE what I just took, haha. So basically I'm relearning the manual mode for this camera, because I have a feeling its going to be an entirely different world from the manual settings on my E-500 (and yes, I only ever go all manual with my dslr, I can't stand the automatic settings). Once I develop this roll I hope to get a better feel for what F-stop to use with what shutter speed and all that good stuff, but I was wondering if someone might have a good little guide or chart or some reference material that I could look at in the mean time. Just so that maybe I won't go through QUITE as many rolls of film while learning the basics. Hmm, it would help if the stupid light meter on the camera worked, it just needs a new battery though. So, yeah, just looking for tips in the way of the mechanics of the camera. I think I'm alright as far as composing photographs goes though, people tell me I have an eye that I could develop into something good. My web site is www.carlsonline.net if you want to check out some random photos (the good ones are mixed in with the mediocre ones so if anyone wants me to point out the ones I like I'd be more than happy, I kind of want to get some opinions from people who are better at this than me).
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,822
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Welcome to the forum.

    Old cameras can be plenty of fun to use. If you are familiar with shooting in manual on your DSLR...then you should be at home with that camera...the relationship between shutter speed and aperture is exactly the same. It may be tough without a light meter though...you could always use your DSLR as a light meter and use those settings on the film camera (remember the ISO).
     
  3. Jon, The Elder

    Jon, The Elder TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southeastern Michigan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Mike......is your chest starting to slip down in your avatar?
     
  4. spookyu

    spookyu TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Ohh, well, alright, hah, I guess I was over thinking it a little. Yeah, I'm just going to get a new battery for the camera so the light meter works on it...errr, it looks old, I hope they still make them.
     
  5. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Messages:
    4,889
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    S.E. Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    That old Nikkormat is a great camera. The meter might be off due to its age, and the oil on the gears for the shutter might be a little stiff and need to be worked. But it is a rock solid and rugged camera. You can expect many more years of shooting with it as long as it has seen a reasonable amount of care so far. I own several and they all still are very usable.
     
  6. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Messages:
    4,889
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    S.E. Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Oh, sorry. Welcome to the TPF, I'm sure you will find us more than willing to help, advise, review, etc. and we still find time to have a little (or a lot) of fun.
     
  7. spookyu

    spookyu TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hah, thanks for the welcome, yeah my grandfather took great care of the camera, everything works flawlessly (the light meter WAS working, but then after a while stopped, thats why I'm assuming its the battery, just gotta go get the replacement tomorrow when I drop off my first couple rolls of film to get developed). Hmmm...I hear thunder...I think I'm going to grab my dslr and see if I can catch some lightning. You'll probably be hearing quite a bit from me on the forum now, everyone here seems friendly and helpful, plus I'd like to upload some pictures and see what people think. Thanks for the advice.
     
  8. jwkwd

    jwkwd TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2005
    Messages:
    630
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western N.Y.
    The battery it uses is a PX625. In the old days, they were batteries that contained mercury, the new ones do not. They should be available at local camera shops. The batteries are a little pricey ( $6-8 US ).
     
  9. Seefutlung

    Seefutlung TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    62
    Location:
    SoCal
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The beauty of a mechanical camera (one of many) is that it will still function even with a dead battery. If you really want to learn photography start shooting with the battery out. Use the Sunny 16 rule ... on bright days the shutter is the reciprocal of the ASA at F/16. So if you're using ASA 125 film .. your basic exposure would be 1/125 @ F/16. Adjust your settings accordingly to subject and lighting conditions.

    While you learn, buy bulk B&W film and develop yourself ... will save beacoup money.

    Shooting without a meter will really help you look at the light. Usually one just looks at the subject ... but this will be an exercise in looking at the light.

    Gary
     
  10. spookyu

    spookyu TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hah, thanks for that little tip, I'll keep that rule in mind even though I did pick up a new battery. Yeah, I plan on starting out with B&W to learn a bit...but I'm not entirely sure about developing it myself, never done that before. I mean, I'm willing to try, if someone could possibly point me in the right direction though.
     
  11. DSLR noob

    DSLR noob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    1,527
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    A guy at the camera store told me that my Canon AE-1 has a good light meter in it, but if I truly wanted to be sure of exposure, I could use the same settings that are on my Canon D rebel XT as a reference and as long as the settings match, the picture should look the same. you can use your E-500 the same way. I love shooting with either of my cameras, and I have more lenses for the AE-1.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

what does an amateur digital photographer need