and its 1 2 3 4

Discussion in 'Collector's Corner' started by mysteryscribe, Apr 7, 2006.

  1. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    Does anyone have an idea what the ancient aperture settings 1 2 3 4 might correspond to on a modern light meter. thanks
     
  2. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm confused...:scratch: Are those numbers from an old lightmeter or a lens?

    If they're from a lightmeter they might refer to LV (or Light Values) of sorts, especially if the numbers go as high as 19 or 20.

    If on a lens... I dunno, I have never seen one like that.

    Do you have a picture of it?
     
  3. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    Its the aperture setting on the lens... kodak brown folders the very first ones.

    No this is the aperture on a early, very early kodak brownie lens im looking at maybe buying.

    I dont have one but take a look at this

    [​IMG]APParently this system was even before the us system of aperture numbering. More like a kodak scene type making system but I'm sure someone knows generally what they mean. I have no experience with them.

    I have a 150mm wallensak set of glass for an antique lens. I'm looing for a shutter thought one of these might be intersting to have on an old camera.

    While looking for a pick I found one of the next generation us f stops. I think the corresponding might be f11 f16 f22 and f32 based simply on the next oldest shutter I could fine was marked us with those equalent makings. Based on the 16 us = f16 rule of conversion.

    If you happen to know more let me know...
     
  4. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Measure the opening. Focal length divided by aperture size = f/#.
     
  6. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    now i just feel stupid. I had that bookmarked for film sizes but never read the whole page. Thanks thats what I thought from the first generation of us numbers they used.

    I do appreciate your looking for me.

    And I dont have the lens yet so it wouldn't be possible to measure it.
     
  7. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    :lol: :lol: You're welcome! That's why we're here, to help each other.
     

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