another beginner's thead (sorry)

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by jretta91, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. jretta91

    jretta91 TPF Noob!

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    Well I want to get into this as a hobby for now. I've done a lot of reading on here but everyone has such different opinions. I'm looking to get something used (old?) for around 150 w/ a lense which seems to be somewhat reasonable from looking around ebay.

    What things should I be looking for as far as features go? I've picked up a few things....
    -manual aperture (this i'll need.. though unsure what aperture priority is)
    -shutter speed (not sure what range i'll need)
    -spot metering??
    -manual ISO control (do I need manual control of this?)

    So far it seems like cameras that meet most of this criteria are:
    Nikon N60,70..
    Canon eos (elan,rebel?...)
    pentax k1000, mx..

    As far as picture style that i'd like to explore...
    B&W interest me
    action shots (motorcycles, cars)
    portraits

    So if anyone can give me some input/recommendations/quick information, I would highly appreciate it. Thanks a lot.
     
  2. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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    Just to add to your list:

    Nikon FE2 / FM2

    Pentax KX / K2
    Pentax Spotmatic (if you can deal with the M42 mount)

    Just a couple other ideas.

    Dave
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    To get started, you should look to the future...and where you plan to take your interest in photography. You can get great old cameras that are fun to learn on...and don't have a bunch of 'useless' bells and whistles. Or you could get something that is more modern and has a few conveniences. If you plan to upgrade on day...or even get a digital SLR...then you should pick a camera & lens that is compatible with what you might someday get.

    The Canon EOS (Rebel, Elan etc) cameras are compatible with EOS digital cameras. Most Nikon cameras and lenses are compatible with the Nikon digital SLR cameras. Get the idea?

    Just about any SLR camera that you will find...will have the ability to adjust the shutter and aperture. Only higher end models have spot metering...but newer low end models will have different metering mode (matrix, centre etc.)

    Some cameras have ISO override, some don't. It's not really necessary...overriding the ISO is just changing the exposure...which you can do in other ways.
     
  4. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    I'd look into the Nikon FE or FM with the MD-12 motor drive attached. It shoots faster than my D70s, and it is compatible with every nikon lens (except 'G' types) made since the 1950's. It makes for a fantastic camera that's a friggin' brick.

    I love my FE, and If you buy AF lenses for it, you can use them on virtually ANY Nikon SLR with AI (all of them since 1970).
     
  5. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Good, basic 35mm cameras for learning film photography include a host of brands. Look for a camera which does not become a paperweight when the battery(s) fail. Shutter speeds should run from 1 to 1/1000 sec. A built-in exposure meter is fine as long as it is not tied into an automatic exposure function. Such rigs, with a good 'normal' [45 - 55mm fl] lens of f1.4 to f2 shouldn't set you back more than $US100 or so. Brands include Canon, Konica, Minolta, Mamiya, Nikon and Pentax, to name a few.

    Do add a hand-held exposure meter, a tripod and a cable release, as well as some filters and a lens hood. If b&w becomes your 'thing', consider doing some or all of your own processing and also bulk-loading your film.
     
  6. jretta91

    jretta91 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks a lot for the help so far guys, i'll take a closer look into the suggestions you guys have given me. Thanks again.
     
  7. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Every Canon or Nikon SLR you choose that has built in metering will have all of those features except for spot metering and some will have that. The choices are literally endless. The advantages of choosing one of these brands was mentioned above. These are imaging companies with a long history of great support and great products. Lens compatibility is important.

    I'm not sure that people disagree. I think they may have different opinions on what is or is not important to themselves. That may or may not be important to you. As an example, I wonder why you think you need spot metering? Are you taking a course that teaches the techniques for using one?
     
  8. jretta91

    jretta91 TPF Noob!

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    No, I didn't need spot metering, i'm not quite sure what it is really, it's just a feature i've come across while trying to read up. So how would a canon eos elan IIe work out? thanks again.
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Any of the EOS Elan camera are great. They are a step above the entry level Rebel series cameras...so they are built a bit better and have a better control layout.

    The 'e' in the name designates that it has 'eye control focus'...which is a neat feature that tracks the movement of you eye while you are looking through the view finder...it then picks the focus point that you are looking at. Some people like it, some hate it...but it can be turned on or off.
     
  10. BoblyBill

    BoblyBill TPF Noob!

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    That's the exact camera that I have. I'm not good enough to give the camera justice. but here's a couple that I took with it.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I personally like the 'eye control focus', but because I do just still shots (right now anyways) there is no need for it really.
     
  11. jretta91

    jretta91 TPF Noob!

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    Well I went ahead and and got the elan IIe for 78 bucks. It comes with a Quantaray Aspherical 28-80mm AF Lens. Are there any other lenses I should look into starting out, or will this one serve me well while i'm still learning. Thanks, and nice shots boblybill.
     
  12. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I suggest getting the Canon EF 50mm F1.8 lens. It's the cheapest Canon lens...so it won't break the bank.

    Sure it won't zoom (you will have to learn to use your feet) but the maximum aperture of F1.8 is so, so much better than the 28-80 lens. Also, the optical quality of the 50mm with blow away the 28-80 Quantaray.

    Congrats on your new camera :thumbsup:
     

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