Another how are these done question...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by tulie, Jan 15, 2007.

  1. tulie

    tulie TPF Noob!

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  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It doesn't look like anything too intensive...those images just have a fairly wide dynamic range. Maybe done through the use of layer masks.
     
  3. tulie

    tulie TPF Noob!

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    So is it partly in the shooting? Can you explain to me how to achieve the look? I am a novice at PS.
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    It doesn't have to be done in PS. Don't rely on photoshop to make photographs good. These do appear to have been tweaked using layers or curves selectively, and to me, it looks fake. Fill flash is ideal in these situations. It can't be done to this degree with a small attached flash on the camera. With some portable monolights and umbrellas, you can get this kind of illumination on the subject, while balancing the available light in the background.
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It can be.

    Let's look at photo 01. The sky is well exposed so maybe that's what the photographer was metering for. The problem is that having the sky well exposed would leave the couple underexposed. One way of fixing that is to use fill flash. The flash will illuminate the couple in the foreground but obviously won't affect the sky...so then both will look well exposed. The trick is to turn the flash exposure down a bit, so that the couple don't look like deer in headlights.

    Another way to brighten up the couple, would be to adjust them separately, with software (photoshop etc.). I think this is what was done here. I would do this with layer masks. A layer mask allows you to 'mask' off part the image...allowing the layer below to show through. This way, you can bring up the brightness of the couple, without affecting the brightness of the sky.
    I assume this is what was done...partially because I can see a bit of a halo on some parts of the couple...which is sometimes a side effect, if your layer mask doesn't have sharp edges.

    There are many, many ways to go about doing this. Try a Google search for Photoshop tutorials.
     
  6. tulie

    tulie TPF Noob!

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    Regarding the second paragraph to big mikes response: Does that mean you would take 2 different exposures, one for the sky and one for their skin and then layer them and mask things to bring in and out? If so, how would you get everything in the same place, especially with a moving subject?
     
  7. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    What you are describing is ok to do with a landscape shot, but not when you have people in the shot that might move between exposures. You would either convert two versions of the raw file, or use a levels or curves adjustment in photoshop. Not the best way to go for image quality on a portrait. You'll probably add some noise.
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Matt is correct, as per usual.

    It's easy to take two separate exposures with a static subject...but that's not practical when shooting people. You can convert a RAW file with different values and combine them...or you can simply make separate adjustments to a single file...but it can introduce things like noise, as Matt mentioned.

    Ideally, the best option is to use fill flash and get it right the first time.
     
  9. clarinetJWD

    clarinetJWD The Naked Spammer Staff Member

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    As long as you're using a tripod, it's relatively easy to do multiple exposure HDR...just take the first shot metered for the people, then have them leave and meter for the environment. Layer them on top, and no problem! (This only works when there are no shadows
     
  10. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I think 1082 and 01 are blended exposures; probably from the same raw file, but it could be two seperate exposures. #10 looks to me to be just an overcast day with an approaching storm. #9 shows some obvious curves work on a selection around the subject.
     
  11. tulie

    tulie TPF Noob!

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    what about the kids in # 13. it has a similar feeling to the beach shots. What is a blended exposure exactly? Thanks
     
  12. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    A blended exposure would be taking parts of 2 or more different exposures of the same scene/composition, and putting them together in PS. For instance take one exposure that's correct for the subject, and one that's correct for the sky, and using layers and masks putting them together as seamless as possible.

    It's also possible to open the same raw file at different exposures, and blend those.

    I don't know if any special techniques were used in #13. It just seems like even lighting to me.
     

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