Any thoughts for salvaging this one?

Discussion in 'Specific Technical Assistance' started by gtkelly, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. gtkelly

    gtkelly TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    This shot is from a cemetery dating back to the 1760's I found by accident a couple of weeks ago. I've done what I can - I like the concept but can't find something I'm really happy with. Any thoughts on how to salvage this one?


    [​IMG]
     
  2. Rusty_Tripod

    Rusty_Tripod TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mesa, AZ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    First of all, it appears that the depth of field is off making it hard to salvage. There is no real problem for me in the lighting and contrast. The sky helps set a mood. The biggest challenge is that you have an odd assortment of shapes that do not coordinate or compliment one another so that they eye moves through the picture in an erratic way. By cropping you could salvage the one large stone, but I do not see any way in which you can redeem this particular shot.

    The subject that you found is an intriguing one. My advice would be to go back, if possible, and consider reframing the primary stone by moving around and looking for interesting compositions. This should be a great spot for experimentation and learning.

    Rusty Tripod
     
  3. gtkelly

    gtkelly TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I think you're right. This was part of a selective focus\DOF exercise so I achieved what I set out to do, but I don't really like it.

    I'm going to head back out there on the next stormy day and see what I can do.
     
  4. TLI

    TLI TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Plymouth State University
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Well gtkelly,
    I was able to resurrect the photo, atleast in my opinion, and here are my two tries;
    Original DOF
    [​IMG]

    New DOF
    [​IMG]

    Tools I used are Burn tool; midtones and highlights, Deep Yellow Photo Filter @ 35%, Brightness/Contrast, and the gaussian blur tool with a layer mask.
    Any more questions feel free to PM

    Things you might also try are bringing out the green grass a bit more, and cooling the overall picture with a cooling filter
     
  5. gtkelly

    gtkelly TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I really like the second of your improvements. Thanks!
     
  6. elsaspet

    elsaspet TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2004
    Messages:
    4,055
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    Dallas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I love the photo and the adjustment is killer!
     
  7. Goran Katic

    Goran Katic TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Did you try a little desaturation on photo and more darker option?
     
  8. glaston

    glaston TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2007
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    That's a pretty good salvage TLI.
    The corrected tonal range makes all the difference and the improved DOF gives it a bit of structure.
    Only problem I see is the sharp edges where the tree-line meets the sky in the 1st image.
    That's fixed with the DOF in the 2nd image though.
    Only thing I'd do differently (and this is just preference, I'm not saying your image needs it) is create a custom mask to use for the DOF.
    Making use of a monochrome gradient so it has a gradual increase in focal blur.

    Just add a layer mask, put a gradient in it, paint/erase out the foreground.
    Run lens blur, inside the lens blur interface set it to get the depth information from the images layer mask.
    Then set it up the rest of the way according to your preference or as the scene requires.

    I like these images alot in terms of the subject matter though too.

    I'm a big fan of cemetery shots and decrepit old rustic interior/exterior shots.
    Never been big on sunny day happy go-lucky stuff. Some are unique which makes them better than average, but I prefer dark and dreary scenes overall.

    Good job, all of you guys.
     

Share This Page