Anybody use medium format (120) film?

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by coolbeansxxBOOM, Nov 25, 2008.

  1. coolbeansxxBOOM

    coolbeansxxBOOM TPF Noob!

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    I recently got the LOMO Holga camera, and while I've been using 35mm in it most of the time, I really want to try out the 120 film I have for it.

    The problem is, that I don't know how to develop it or where to get it developed.

    I develop my own black and white negative 35mm film, and although this may be a stupid question, can I develop the medium format b/w neg film the same way with the same chemicals?

    Or, can anybody recommend a good (preferably cheap) company to send/take the film to?

    -Michelle
     
  2. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yes. Just make sure you have a reel that accepts 120 film and practice loading with a wasted film. Some people (including me) find it a bit harder to load 120 compared to 35mm film. Also the development times are sometimes different between 35mm and 120 film. Check the manufacturer data sheets
     
  3. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    strange as it seems , loading 120 seems to be eaiser with steel reels than plastic. Most of my students have serious issues with 35mm film and ss reels, and are at ease with 35mm on plastic; however the reverse seems to work with 120.

    Steph has given you good advice. the only addition would be , be sure you have some negative sleeves for the 120 as well.

    doing your own is certainly much cheaper, is not hard and some of even love doing so :)
     
  4. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The following links might help in your quest to develop MF at home:

    CLICK

    CLICK

    CLICK


    It's not hard to load the 120 on the reels, just that it takes a wee of practice in the dark. As suggested above, try it with a wasted 120 film, at first in plain light, then in the dark.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

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    It's not so strange where I'm concerned. Loading 120 on ss reels were always a snap to me whereas 35mm would give me fits, and I had to expect the first five frames to be a waste. A friend of mine loaned me a 35mm reel that worked perfectly every time, but then he took it back, the bastid.:grumpy:
     
  6. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Sounds like she has the goods. Just needs to make sure she has a 120 reel. Or at least an adjustable. Same chems and times comparing like to like.
     
  7. Dick Sanders

    Dick Sanders TPF Noob!

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    I shoot Ilford Delta Pro 100 and 400 exclusively. I've found that the best developer is Kodak xTol, diluted 1:1. Steel reels is the way to go. You just need to pinch the edges to make the film slightly concave and it'll roll around fine. Years ago, Fred Picker's Zone VI company made a 120 film guide device that attached to the reels that would guide the film without fail. Calumet bought that company, but they don't make the item anymore, but it's the kind of thing you might find out there. I still have mine and they work great. As a general rule, the thicker 400 speed film is easier to load without the dreaded crinkling.
     
  8. Patrick12345

    Patrick12345 TPF Noob!

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    If you don't want to do it yourself you could try "The Whole Picture Online" they offer free postage and a free cd with standard size prints, it works out at 9 quid for colour or 11 quid for black and white!
    Amazing service
     
  9. Early

    Early TPF Noob!

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    I always found it easier to load 120 than 35mm. Of course, maybe they were just better reels.
     

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