Anything I should think of when using a 1600 B&W?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Axel, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    US East Coast
    Hi,

    This will be my first time taking pictures with a 1600 B&W (Fuji) in my N50 camera. I have shot three rolls before and none of them have turned out satifactiry to me apart from a few pictures. I have been limited as to the space where I have taken them too, but that should not be a problem now.

    I wonder if there is anything I should think of when using such a fast film and B&W. Are there anything I can take advantage of right off hand?

    Let me know please.

    Thank you
     
  2. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,740
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Down the Rabbit Hole.
    Only thing I can think of is work with the grain. You will have it no matter what, use it to your advantage.
     
  3. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    US East Coast
    Thanks, but how do I take advantage of the grain?

    And one more thing. I have tried to take "artistic" pictures which all have turned into garbage! It may have been just of a bottle of whiskey, a glass or just about anything, just to experiment. But they all turn out like crap. Is it necessary to have a small-medium format camera film for that purpose?
     
  4. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,740
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Down the Rabbit Hole.
    Take a look at this photo: http://www.dpchallenge.com/image.php?IMAGE_ID=108995 It's extremely grainy but it works. Try to take photos of "rough" things, even things you wouldn't normally take photos of. Try to avoid sunsets and the like. Hopefully I'm making sense.

    Do you need a medium format camera to get artistic? Absolutely not. It really doesn't matter what type of camera you use, virtually any camera can get quality photos, it really only matters how familiar you are with your camera.

    Do you have any examples? That would definately make it easier to give pointers.
     
  5. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    US East Coast
    Thanks jadin,

    I think you make sense. I wish I could show you some pictures of what I've taken, but I don't have a place to upload them from... If I could upload them from my machine, I could have shown you a few (not all, because I am really embarrassed or most of them!).
     
  6. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,237
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rochester, NY Velocity: Unknown
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    What about them is unsatisfactory?
     
  7. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    US East Coast
    Everything from blurry to the motive! Bottles on a mattress, spice bottles in the kitchen water in a sink... CRAP! But there are a few that may be worth showing. I mean there are picture that I can see what is wrong with them and there are those that I may need input. In the case of the crappy pics, I don't need the input... LOL! I guess you understand what I mean.
     
  8. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,740
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Down the Rabbit Hole.
    Well for me personally, I can't stand when people 'setup' a scene for still life. It looks so unnatural. Even if that's how advertisers would do it. It just doesn't look right.

    What I'd recommend is having them in their natural settings. Say on a table with dirty glasses next to them. Then remove anything that doesn't fit. (a coke can, stuff like that) and photograph the rest as is.

    But that's just my personal preference.
     
  9. doxx

    doxx TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2003
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    behind the viewfinder
    I use Tri-X 400 pushed to 1600 as my 'standard film'
    oftentimes I need the speed. I love the high contrast
    look, but I hate the super-grainy look with normal
    developers. With Diafine I get superb results...

    [​IMG]
    Tri-X @1600 developed in Diafine, tiny adjustments in Photoshop
     
  10. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,740
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Down the Rabbit Hole.
    The tones are gorgeous doxx. First time I've ever wanted to use film.
     
  11. doxx

    doxx TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2003
    Messages:
    499
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    behind the viewfinder
    thank you! but I can't take all the credit...

    I have tried to get this look out of digital for a long time.
    It is possible to get close - but I haven't found a way to get
    the look of b/w film dead on (I'm using Photoshop
    professionally since 1990)

    this film/developer combo just does it for me
    (Tri-X@1600/Diafine), actually the lens (Leica Summicron
    is part of the game too) :roll:
     
  12. Axel

    Axel TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    US East Coast
    WOW! I wish I'll be able to take such nice pictures!

    Where would you develop the film? I live in Broklyn, NY, but I don't know where to develop around here. And I have heard that with these films, it should be a laboratory... Maybe that is why I am not happy with my previous rolls! LOL! Nah, I won't blame the developers. I think I have a lot to learn... :oops:
     

Share This Page