Aperture and Sunlight

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by yogibear, Oct 26, 2008.

  1. yogibear

    yogibear TPF Noob!

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    I was playin around with the use of f/22 aperature and DOF on a sunny day. I adjusted my light meter for proper exposures but found that most of the shots came out incredibly dark.

    I have read that larger f-stops allow for a more clear DOF and was practicing the technique. I also realize that the larger the f-stop the smaller the hole that allows light to hit film/digital surface. This day was extremely bright but i still had troubles with a lack of light.

    My question is with larger f-stops should I be looking for bright lighting and lower contrast between subjects and backgrounds? Will adjusting the ISO settings help improve?

    Cant upload pictures at the moment but if you need examples i can show you at some other time. More interested in theory behind it to help me understand.

    Thanks.
    Yogi
     
  2. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    You need a longer shutter speed, if they're dark, you need more exposure.
     
  3. Sim

    Sim TPF Noob!

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    When you say "I adjusted my light meter for proper exposures but found that most of the shots came out incredibly dark" what exactly do you mean?
    Are you metering for proper exposures of the sky or your subject? Since you said you had problems with "lack of light" I suspect you were metering for the sky (maybe inadvertently).

    Generally speaking when you have high contrast scenes like that you'll either end up with a properly exposed subject and blown out sky or dark subject and properly exposed sky. HDR is one way to get a properly exposed image in those circumstances; a lot of people have very strong feelings about HDR so I'm not going to comment on that further except to say that it's just an option that you could consider. To each their own. Shooting lower contrast scenes will help avoid the problem you had as well.

    I'm not sure what mode you're shooing in, but you shouldn't have to use a higher ISO on a sunny day. Like Sw1tchFX suggested, just go into Manual mode and use a longer shutter speed or adjust your exposure compensation by a stop or two if you're shooting in aperture priority mode.
     
  4. yogibear

    yogibear TPF Noob!

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    I was shooting in full manual mode. I didnt have my tripod with me so i went with a little faster shutter speed and im guessing that is the problem. That and the accidently metering from the sky. Going to take it out today and see if i cant get the shots i was looking for with a little bit more time for the exposure. Now that i think about it this seems like common sence. Hmm thanks again for steering me in the right direction of thought. This is why i love this place :D
     
  5. tenlientl

    tenlientl TPF Noob!

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    you're right, it's the shutter speed.

    faster shutter speed means you only allow a certain, in this case, small amount of light comming in. with f/22, you might try to lower the shutter speed.

    im assuming you're not trying to get a photo of a fast moving object.
     
  6. tsaraleksi

    tsaraleksi TPF Noob!

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    Unless you are in a situation where getting the absolute maximum DoF is paramount, it's best to shy away from f/22 because it will introduce diffraction into your images-- a result of the light having to bend to too small an angle. The result is softness.
     

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