Are these HDR material and can (could) someone create a HDR for me?

Discussion in 'Photoshop Challenges' started by LaFoto, Jul 25, 2006.

  1. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Here I have two different set-ups of the bridge, both bracketed, and I know too little to even KNOW if a HDR can be made of each of the set of three? I did not touch these, other than resize them to a large (for the web) 1200x800 pixels ... can anyone work with them?

    Set one:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Set two:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Would they have needed to be RAW files?
    Sorry, they aren't :oops: ...

    And if only my PS weren't an ancient version ... all the online tutorials on how to create a HDR all take CS as their example version, and not 6.0, whose licence ran out in 1999 (!!!) :roll:

    DANG. Even Picturetrail reduced them in size ... they don't show up here as 1200x800 pixel pics .... grrr :grumpy:
     
  2. magicmonkey

    magicmonkey TPF Noob!

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    I just had a play with the first set in CS2 and although they do work in HDR (beautiful sky) the camera seems to have moved a tiny bit for each shot so they don't line up propperly, I'm sure someone who was a bit better than me with photoshop could correct that though...
     
  3. Arch

    Arch Damn You! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Ideally you want tiff's or psd's to use for the HDR merge..... to get the best quality conversion.
    But i dont think these will really work well in any case corinna.... the range in the photo's isn't different enough to take advantage of the HDR merge....

    i.e. the bridge in the first one should be almost visable in at least one of the exposures..... and likewise in the second.... along with the trees in the forground......

    If you take a look at the link HERE..... and scroll down to the 7 test images of the landscape..... you can see how 'far apart' the exposures are before you begin the HDR merge.

    Its difficult to get right.... and on a few occasions i'v come back from the field with a series of exposures that just didnt really work well.... it takes time and patience to get a good one going. ;)
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    What he said :)

    When you are exposing the scene, and you know you want to compose an HDR picture, you should use center weighted average metering, (or spot if you have it). You need to have a series of shots that expose the highlights well, and then a series where you have metered for the shadows, and there is detail. In this case, you would meter with your center weighted average, on a part of the bridge, which is in sillhouette here, and expose it so that we can see detail on it, (which would make the sky very overexposed, but don't worry about that)
     
  5. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Ah, I see ... Well, it is ok. There is still HEAPS of things I have to learn! Loads! I have always known that. Thanks for looking, anyway.
     

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