Arlington National Cemetery

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by darin3200, Jul 17, 2005.

  1. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    I posted this photo a while back in the Photo Gallery Forum but I've done some editing on it and would like a critique of that. I don't know the shutter speed, f-stop or anyting because this was on a point-and-shoot camera. The intent of the editing was to contrast the beautiful flowers and trees filled with life with the enormous numbers of graves. I fear that with the selective coloring that my point is too balantly obvious.
    All comments appreciated.

    The unedited
    [​IMG]


    The edited
    [​IMG]
     
  2. DramaDork626

    DramaDork626 TPF Noob!

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    hehe, i have been there, cemetaries creep me out..
    Anyway, I like the view. However, I like the second one better because the first one looks like a little too plain. The second one is more eyecatching and ok, i'll use a stupid word, JAZZY
     
  3. Geronimo

    Geronimo TPF Noob!

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    The first one needs some more contrast in it. The second one, well the color selective area needs to be a bit more smooth, if that makes much sense. What I mean, is the color part stands out too much.
     
  4. bogleric

    bogleric TPF Noob!

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    I also would agree that the first shot is too plain and the edits do help. However, the color in the second stands out just a little too much. I think this is because of the volume of color that is close to the viewer. Do you have a shot with just the tree in the field and not the up close branch? I think that would create the more desired color effect that you are looking for.

    It is interesting that the color is red and this is a cemetary.
     
  5. Calliope

    Calliope TPF Noob!

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    I'm going to go against the grain here and say I prefer the first one better. The second one's color is too strong and it kind of takes away from the "cemetary feel" - not sure if I'm explaining myself well.
     
  6. JonMikal

    JonMikal TPF Noob!

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    hmmmm, i think your focus in both is to emphasize the cherry blossum/dogwood (i can't tell which it is) and you should, they are beautiful trees, but the second isn't working at all for me unless you're trying to convey life/death. (ah, i just reread your intro) well, it still doesn't do much for me...something about that branch. i agree bumping the contrast in the first may help. i may be biased, but i've never seen a cemetary shot in color that i like...especially this cemetary. the arlington cemetary is usually brought to you in b&w through well known photographers and for good reason....it properly sets the mood. just my personal preference.
     
  7. binglemybongle

    binglemybongle TPF Noob!

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    Dont knw how you would feel about this but......

    How about rotating the shot about 10 degrees anticlockwise?

    It feels to me as though the shot is slipping off to the right. I dont think it would be noticeable.

    Worth a try??? Colours are fine to me (the edited version).
     
  8. nikon90s

    nikon90s TPF Noob!

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    NICE SHOTS
     
  9. Quizbiz

    Quizbiz TPF Noob!

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    I vote for the seccond one, it has more 'meaning' if yuou will, it may not look like the place, but it feels like the place more than the first one. The colors make you sence the death, and the lives lost.

    Perhaps you should try cropping a small bit from the bottom to give it more of an endless-ness feel?
     
  10. opaldoll

    opaldoll TPF Noob!

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    The selective color appears fine to me, though I've never seen a dogwood in person and thus have no idea if the color you're going for is realistic or slightly punched up. However, I generally agree that still picture of a cemetary, particularly one as large or solemn as Arlington, should be in black and white. It lends a somber silence and grace to it, or something less stuffy sounding but with similar meaning.

    To critique your specific photo, rather than the genre, I would say that there's something that draws me more to right side. It's partially the way the headstones align, and partially that that area seems less sharp, or higher in contrast, or both. Whatever the reason, my eyes are drawn to that side almost immediately, despite the color.
     
  11. skunkboy

    skunkboy TPF Noob!

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    I was last at Arlington in the mid 90's on a vacation that included DC as well as places like Williamsburg. Pictures are great but nothing says just how stunning it really is when you're there in person. Either way, it amazes me how looking over such a vast area, the stones are in lines no matter what angle you look from. A tragic part of our history but displayed in such a remarkable layout. Great shot.
     
  12. Ohio

    Ohio TPF Noob!

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    I like the edited one very much. It seems to state Life (the tree) needs to be in focus and grab your attention more than death and staleness .
     

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