Automotive Pictures and Settings

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by layedout72, Jun 20, 2007.

  1. layedout72

    layedout72 TPF Noob!

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    Hey everyone, just wanted to get your opinions on how I should have my camera set up as a base line idea for automotive pictures. I have a Sony DSC H2. More times than not its lunch time until 4 pm or a LITTLE later when I am taking pictures. I don't have any lenses, or filters, just what came with the camera. What settings should I be using to get a good solid picture?

    Once again, I know I am not going to get professional quality, just don't want "snap shots".
     
  2. deanimator

    deanimator TPF Noob!

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    Photos of cars?
    Parked or racing?
    For what end purpose?

    More info is required for anyone to start trying to help.
     
  3. layedout72

    layedout72 TPF Noob!

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    Sorry about that. Let's start out with parked cars, for personal use. With good enough quality for an online magazine, or the potential to become that.
     
  4. deanimator

    deanimator TPF Noob!

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    Ok...we can start with a few basic ideas.

    But...most important is: there is no rule!

    1) look carefully at the "market" and what they are expecting. Maybe check with them for image format (jpeg or TIFF) and size requirements. For web use only a smallish jpeg is no problem.
    2) experiment with similar angles and play around with the wide angle and telephoto views
    3) good quality post-processing is gonna make a big difference (Photoshop Elements $100)

    There are also the "settings"...the correct exposure and white balance.
    Most of the time, in normal daylight, you are quite safe to leave all of this on "automatic". Adjustments are only sometimes necessary. Let autofocus do it´s thing cos your car isn´t moving.
    It only starts to get tricky if you shoot really early or really late in the day.

    You do have to educate yourself a bit too. Find out what the different formats are, and what they are useful for. What exposure is and how to manage it. Using some software like Photoshop is a big trip in itself, but as anyone here will tell you...it´s well worth it.

    Welcome to the forum...good luck, and post up some of your work for comments.
     

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