b&w film

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by messier, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. messier

    messier TPF Noob!

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    i was recently reccomended pro B&w film. I was wondering if anyone has found a difference between standard and pro b&w film. i was basically shooting old barns and such outdoors. i shot 2 rolls of 125 and 1 roll of 400 pro film and am waiting on the lab to develop them. also what tends to look better matte or glossy finish. thanks in advance for any feedback
     
  2. Rob A

    Rob A TPF Noob!

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    i like matte much much mire than glossy for black and white, but i guess thats just my opinion. im not sure about the difference in films though sorry. :shock:
     
  3. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Personal preference, but for B&W enlargements I think semi-gloss or gloss looks very classy. :)
     
  4. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I prefer matte or simi-gloss with B&W because whites on glossy paper reflect light.

    Not sure what you mean by pro B&W, because IMO most B&W film could be consider pro film.
     
  5. santino

    santino TPF Noob!

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    usually "pro" films have less grain, thats all I can think of atm :D
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    The only BW film that I'm away of that even has a "pro" and a "standard" version is Tri-X. Tri-X Pro is made for easy retouching, and is ISO 320 instead of ISO 400. I guess there is probably pro and consumer C-41 BW.

    Maybe consumer C-41 BW is "amateur", and traditional process BW is "pro" :)

    For landscapes with 35mm film I would have chosen Tmax 100 on a tripod, but I've heard that the new version of Tmax 100 is not the same beast it used to be. An ISO 125 film would be a good choice. I like fine grain in my BW landscapes.

    Film choice is personal. There is no magic film that is perfect in all situations. In fact I'd say a tripod will do more for landscape work than any particular brand of film. It's better to choose one film and stick with it for a dozen or so rolls to really get to know how you and the film get along. What works for me may not work for you.
     
  7. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Pro colour films are made to have better colour accuracy but this means that they are more unstable and go 'off' quicker which is why they have to be kept in a chiller or freezer. They are also made in 'daylight' and 'tungsten' types.
    Amateur colour film is designed to be kept on a warm shelf in a brightly lit store for months without loosing fidelity - but the tradeoff is that the colour accuracy isn't too good.
    Under most circumstances amateurs wouldn't notice the difference (but then neither would a lot of 'pros'!).
    Black and white has a similar deal going with the amateur stuff being designed to sit on a warm shelf etc.
    The pro b/w film tends to loose tonal range due to build up off base level fog unless it is refrigerated. At one time pro b/w used to have a gelatine coat on both sides for retouching and to reduce curl.
    Once you get to 5x4 and 10x8 you can only get pro film.
    There are other advantages to using pro film - you know when it was manufactured and you can buy it all from the same batch (if you want me to go into the technical reasons why these are important to pro's I will if you ask but it is very boring).
    Pro labs sell film off cheap when it has gone over it's use-by date so it is worth going in and asking if they have any - you can pick up a bargain and as it has been kept chilled it is usually OK.
     
  8. Artemis

    Artemis Just Punked Himself

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    www.Darkroompros.com is a site devoted to black and white photography, maybe they can help you? ;)
    (Sorry :( Had to try and advertise)
     
  9. Soulreaver

    Soulreaver TPF Noob!

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    I think matte papers give less contrast than gloss ones.Sometimes I use semi matte and other times gloss.
    If its fiber I use gloss, didnt like matte fiber.
     
  10. PreludeX

    PreludeX TPF Noob!

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    T grain films are really crappy.. i hate them so much but thats what we mostly shoot in my classes... id say plus x is good or even better.. ilford pan f plus 50... thats some good stuff!!!
     
  11. PreludeX

    PreludeX TPF Noob!

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    tripod just helps you get better detail, while that the films are different and have a different impact.. such as kodak 125px has a better tonal range than tmax 100... and really, to make shots look good is to do some work in the dark room yourself :D thats how i like to do it
     
  12. Mumfandc

    Mumfandc TPF Noob!

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    My favorite B&W films:

    1) Fuji Neopan Acros 100 (very nice smooth tone)
    2) Ilford Pan F Plus (processed w/care, VERY fine grained)
    3) Agfa Scala 200 (B&W transparency)

    I also REALLY like Ilford XP2, despite B&W enthusiasts arguing it's not "real" B&W. You'll often get a slight color cast w/this film, though one time I got proofs which came back with an INTENSE cyan blue cast/midtone color to them...real crappy 1-hour lab anyway.

    I always prefer to have B&W printed on matte paper or semi-matte. Maybe it's just me, but I think it has better contrast this way. Color I always print glossy (2nd option Lustre), the color seems more saturated, I guess because less light scattering on the paper surface...
     

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125 px film bettervthan tmax?