B+W Photo for critique

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by MostlyDigital, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. MostlyDigital

    MostlyDigital TPF Noob!

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    I don't think these photos are anything special. I am more struggling with composition these days. I seem to find interesting subjects, in this case an old run down barn. How do I know if I have enough black, white, and grey space? How should I crop or compose these shots? What should I be thinking. These were all shot in RAW and adjusted in photoshop. Shot with a canon 50mm lens. The second image is just cropped from the first. I feel I have no focus of attention in this picture, but I kind of like how it was exposed. What are the bad points of the composition, subject, and exposure of these pictures. Thanks for looking :)

    Also with these pictures I bracketed the exposures (which I do just about all the time) and blended portions with layermask. In the old barn the hole in the roof showing the tree outside was blended.

    What are everyone's thoughts on bracketing? Does it really teach you anything? How do I learn proper exposure?

    1/40 f/3.2 ISO:640
    [​IMG]
    same settings as above, this pic is a crop.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. MostlyDigital

    MostlyDigital TPF Noob!

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    oh man the images on my computer are sharper than in this post. boo photobucket. just imagine them sharper :lol:
     
  3. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    This is the first posting I have ever come across on here where I feel that what you are really asking for is the kind of detailed critique that we wish posters to our Photo Critique section would ask for when they submit a photo to there. And I feel half inclined to (for the first time ever) move this thread from the General Gallery over to Photo Critique and not the other way round (which happens much more frequently).

    But for the time being I'll leave this in General, and you might decide for either the first plus its crop (since it is ONE photo only, really) or for the last to stay, and then I can move it. Critique in Photo Critique usually goes or at least is MEANT TO go much deeper than in the galleries, and your questions are much more asking for in-depth critique...

    My initial thought about the first is that, indeed, you felt right about composition of the inside of that dilapidated hut and went for a crop solution to your problem which does help. I feel it also helps the toning of your photo and light/shadow distribution. The original frame is heavily shadowed on the right and very bright where the roof is broken on the upper left, with little detail left on the trailer or whatever it is that is parked there. So to concentrate on the opening, the wall, the texture of that wall, the wood of the props, the fact that someone once tried to set fire to one of them, all that comes out much better in the cropped version. The sky is still a bit blown but that is not so prominent in the cropped version since it does not have such a dark counterpart as is given in the original frame.
     
  4. danir

    danir No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well, since it is not the critique section I'll allow myself to just say I love the last shot.
    The tree line and the cloudy sky, make a moody seen.

    Dani
     
  5. MostlyDigital

    MostlyDigital TPF Noob!

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    Oh awesome. Thanks for the feedback LaFoto and Danir.

    I was afraid of posting this in the Critique forum because I read all the rules and I felt that this belonged in the General gallery just to be on the safe side. But if you have the ability to move this to the critique forum can you please do that if you feel it can be there? Do I have to remove the last picture, or can you do that when you move the thread? Thanks again.
     
  6. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I can do that. OK, so this will move - first time I move a pic TO Photo Critique, I usually move them OUT OF there ;). But you ARE asking for really serious critique! So there!

    And ok, I'll edit out the last one and we discuss the first (plus edit). OK?

    I also adapted your title to the new place this is in now, ok? ;)

    A pity that this now makes Dani's comment a bit senseless, but you are welcome to repost that photo, too! Any time!
     
  7. New Hampshire

    New Hampshire TPF Noob!

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    I would crop from the left side over to the last beam on the right. It would add another layer of tonality that, for me, just makes the picture look the best. The origional crop has some great tone to it, but adding a little more dark to the overall look would be just the ticket (just not TOO much dark, as in the origional photo.)

    Brian
     
  8. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    The general exposure rule, is that you're going to have problems if there is more than a 3 stop difference between the lightest and darkest parts of your shot. This is true of your shot. The only real way around this is to use a graduated ND filter (neutral density).

    Without going into a full rant about people photographing barns, I'll just say that I've seen a thousand photos of old barns before. There probably aren't many things more difficult in the world of photography than shooting an old barn in a way that hasn't been seen before.
     
  9. MostlyDigital

    MostlyDigital TPF Noob!

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    Good eye NH, here is that crop.
    [​IMG]

    Yeh I will def be going back with a ND filter for a reshoot. I agree that barns are shot alot, I am not really trying to shoot a unique picture of a barn, more than exposing one correctly maybe? I will keep that 3 stops rule in mind. I do not think this picture is good or great. I just think there are interesting aspects to the subject that maybe I could exploit.

    How would you shoot an old barn with a hole in the roof. The light ouring in casting awesome light on wood grain, but neglecting the guts of the place? Leaving the rest in the dark is a decision to make.

    I am very confused by HDR photos I am still trying to understand how to even make one. I read directions and get instantly lost, but would this place be a good candidate for one? Bright light outside, good light near the hole, and no light inside the place? Exposing for each lighting situation and combining them all, in my mind might have a cool effect.

    In this case should I be doing this anyway with this particular subject, shooting many many exposures for the different part of the frame and then combining in photoshop?
     
  10. gmarquez

    gmarquez TPF Noob!

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    My only critique is to not be so afraid to get dirty...kneel down, and point the camera up to get more interesting perspective or angles. Lie down and shoot along the floor. Use your viewfinder to decide what is cr@p, and what is not. When you see a scene that looks 'interesting' in your viewfinder, snap a shot. Chances are, you will still end up with a lot of cr@p (I know I do), but you have a better chance of composing something interesting.
     
  11. New Hampshire

    New Hampshire TPF Noob!

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    Ahhhhh, yes me likes very much now! :lmao:

    Brian
     

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