Background for still life

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by ilghila, Dec 18, 2006.

  1. ilghila

    ilghila TPF Noob!

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    I want to buy some kind of fabric to use as a background in still life photos, but I'm wondering which is the best kind of textile. What characteristics should I look for? Thank you.
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    They will be your prints and so it's your call. I cannot, should not, will not attempt to dictate your taste.
     
  3. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    A solid color is all I ever cared about. Flat matte if you are going to light it. Otherwise I can't think of anything that makes one better than another.

    How and what you attach it to probably makes more difference than the material itself.
     
  4. basil_chiu

    basil_chiu TPF Noob!

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    I think it depends on what your goals are, especially the mood you're trying to convey.

    Also, it depends on the scale. If your still life is human scale, you may want a photo backdrop because they don't have seams. I've used aluminium foil taped together to photograph kitchen gadgets.

    You can always use darkness as a backdrop. For example: clear out your garage, put your subject on one side, put your camera between the subject and the wall, then aim for the dark emptiness. (Of course, only light the subject). This is the blackest, cheapest backdrop of all.
     
  5. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    Bedsheets are my favorite.
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    This is a good place to start. How big do you need it? A large piece of paper would make a great background for smaller stuff. It can be curved to cover both the area behind and under the subject...leaving you with a seamless transition.
     
  7. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    As said, it's entirely up to you, and what your concept is. That being said, for my still lifes, I normally don't use any kind of fabric. I prefer to use large sheets of foamcoare or mat board in different colors. I have one piece of foamcore which I have roughed up by creasing it in several spots, to give a weathered look. The advantage to using boards as a background is that they are easily propped up. If you buy thinner mat board in long sheets, you can curve it and have your subject on the board, and have the board curve up behind for a seamless look.
     
  8. ilghila

    ilghila TPF Noob!

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    Thank you all, guys!
     
  9. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    Well most of my stuff is small so I have two two by two sheets of very thin playwood from the home depot (no plug intended) the are attached with duct tape then spray painted black one one side and white on the other. Just to prevent see though on the cloth. I put them on a table inside or outside. Toss a small piece of cloth over them to make a seamless back drop. Very portable to follow the light and very easy to toss a cloth of any color over. I do not shoot cars though or anything else of any size.

    Ps you can put your own seam in black backdrops it doesnt show. Unless you mix up the cloth somehow.
     

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