band photo's

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by joebro, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. joebro

    joebro TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey everyone i'm completely new to photography but have recently purchased an olympus 0m 10 and i'm interested in taking some good pictures of my band, probably at rehearsal not live.
    can anyone offer any advice to help a complete noob thanks.
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2003
    Messages:
    25,290
    Likes Received:
    2,078
    Location:
    In the mental ward of this forum
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I moved this thread for you, where it will get better views. :D
     
  3. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    London
    The OM10 is a great camera. What lenses do you have?

    Rob
     
  4. linzmcwilliams

    linzmcwilliams TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northumberland, UK
    Just try lots of different angles, use a tripod and self timer. Black and white usually does the trick too.
     
  5. hot shot

    hot shot TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    496
    Likes Received:
    0
    all you can do is keep taking photographs all it takes is expeience but try odd angles and the such like
     
  6. Ajax

    Ajax TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    UK
    Great choice of camera :thumbup: do you have the manual adaptor on it ?

    Keep at it.. as photography gets more fun the longer you do it
     
  7. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,237
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rochester, NY Velocity: Unknown
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    That's kind of tough, as it's a bit open-ended. The best advice I can think of isn't technical. It's to limit your choices. New photographers haven't had a chance to experiement yet, so they don't yet know what does what or what they like to use.

    Think about what you want as far as look goes, make choices that fit that look, and then stick with them through the shoot.

    Do you want color or B&W? -> film choice

    Do you want it well lit or dark and moody? -> lighting and film choice (flash? hot lights? available light? high ISO/grainy film?)

    Close up and personal or more distant and all-encompasing? -> focal length
    - This can be varied somewhat depending on whether you are shooting a group shot or an individual at that moment, but if you are using a zoom lens, don't pick a position and then zoom to fit. Pick two or 3 focal lengths you are going to work with and then *move* to fit the image in the viewfinder. Something like 35mm, 50mm, and 100mm, depending on what you have.

    Do you want crisp motion capture, or do you want some motion blur? -> shutter speed

    Do you want it all in focus, or select parts? -> aperture

    And shutter/aperture/ISO all has to be balanced, so decide the order of importance, as the last one will be determined by the other two. In order for one to change, one of the other two must.

    Handheld vs. tripod can result in a different feel also, but that tends to be more related to how it fits into the way you work. I like to move around a lot, so a tripod tends to get in my way. But I rate being able to go with the flow over the crispest images. Others have different priorities.

    Figuring this stuff out ahead of time can make the difference between a haphazard bunch of snapshots and a nice consistent series. I think it's good to experiement, but I believe if you limit your choices within a specific set, you can learn a lot more than if you vary from shot to shot. The next time you shoot something, pick a different set of variables to work within. You might want to try shooting several rehersals to see which series works best for you.
     

Share This Page