Begginer Question About Scanners

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by agwhite, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. agwhite

    agwhite TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ive been reading these posts about scanners and best scanners for film and such. I DIDNT KNOW YOU COULD SCAN FILM. Is this how most of you film shooters go about working with film and photos? Is it an alternative to developing them and going through all that?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,818
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    You still need to develope the film...but you don't necessarily have to make prints.

    Scanning the film (negatives or positives (slides)) can get you much better results than scanning a print...especially if you use a dedicated film scanner (not a flat bed). Although, some flat bed scanners with film attachments, can do a decent job.

    While you can get great digital images from scanning...it's not a fast process. Often, it takes additional processing to clean up the images...although, good software can help to combat things like dust spots.

    When I shot film, I considered getting a film scanner...but it was just easier to get my film scanned when I took it in for developing.
     
  3. agwhite

    agwhite TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    alright then for a begginner.. any suggestions on a decent dedicated film scanner at a reasonable price?
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,818
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I had always heard good things about the Minolta Dimage range of film scanners...and they apparently come with software (maybe firmware) that is really good for removing the dust spots.

    That was a few years ago...I don't know if they even make scanners anymore...since Sony bought out the photographic division of Konica Minolta.

    I'm sure you can search for reviews etc. on the web.

    As with anything, you get what you pay for. A good film scanner, a few years ago, cost about as much as (or more) than an entry level DSLR does now...in which case, I'd recommend the camera.

    As I mentioned, a decent flat bed that has a film scanning attachment might give acceptable results...for only a few hundred dollars or less.
     
  5. agwhite

    agwhite TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    how is the epson perfection v100 photo scanner?
    its flatbed but that will work for me
     
  6. Peanuts

    Peanuts TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Messages:
    2,905
    Likes Received:
    85
    Location:
    Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The Nikon Coolscan Scanners I believe are near the top of the line for consumer film scanners.

    Another option is the Epson 4490 Perfection Photo Scanner, which goes for around $250, which I believe is a slight step up from teh v100. I have actually seen an individual purchase this item, and bring it back because a 'line kept showing up in the scan'. It was tried out and sure enough, a line! When the film was brought over to the light table and looked at with some magnification, sure enough there was a very fine line down the film it. Not bad for $250!
     
  7. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,818
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
  8. agwhite

    agwhite TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well you can get it for 99 with a 40 rebate so it comes out to almost nothing. If Im shooting film and im a begginner and i want to start editing images digitally... this should be fine right?
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,818
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Yes, should be fine.

    But if you are shooting color film and developing at a lab...I still think it's easier to just have them put on a CD at that time.
     
  10. agwhite

    agwhite TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2007
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    for more money though.... long term it makes sense to turn things into a digital format myself
     
  11. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,818
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Well, if you are thinking long term, wouldn't it be better to just get a digital camera?

    I was surprised at how much cleaner the images are from my digital camera than from film that I had scanned. If you figure in all the extra edit/cleaning time you might spend on scanned files...a digital camera is the way to go, IMO.
     
  12. schumionbike

    schumionbike TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Messages:
    1,083
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hi, what was the resolution that you got from the lab when you had them put on the CD? When, I had Walmart put my pictures on CD, it was like 1.5 megapixel which I was expecting much higher resolution.
     

Share This Page