beginner and lots of ?????

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by michellek, Oct 1, 2007.

  1. michellek

    michellek TPF Noob!

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    Hello, I'm new to photography, and wanted to pick it up as a hobby. Basically just to take pics of my family.
    I've been reading up on all the different cameras, lighting etc... basically I'm overwhelmed with it all.
    Where does one begin? I have one spot in my home, in my basement that I'm wanting to convert to a studio.
    Anyone have advise for me? I know that is such a broad question, but for a beginner, I don't really know what I should be asking.
    I'd like to know what kind of digital camera would be the best suitable one for me, just as a hobby, though.
    Anyways, would like to hear from you all with all your input.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Peanuts

    Peanuts TPF Noob!

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    Welcome!

    You provided lots of great information but there are a few more questions you need to ask yourself.

    What is your budget? Have you considered starting with natural light, which you will essentially be mimicking in the studio (which can be quite an expensive venture)?
     
  3. amateursnapper

    amateursnapper TPF Noob!

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    Hi Michelle,

    If your serious enough to be setting up a home studio then you'll need a digital SLR to get the most out of it. An entry level one would do but you won't get away with using a point and click.

    As for a home studio, things to consider are backdrops (plain, patterned, coloured etc), and lighting will be very important (a two-light setup should be fine for a beginner, as well as being easier to learn than a setup with more lights). A tripod is essential, and the capability to hook up your camera to your computer so you can view your images large instantly would be very useful. Finally don't forget that if you're taking portraits your subjects will need somewhere to sit, so have a think about chairs and/or boxes that you can arrange.

    As Peanuts said, it depends largely on your budget. If you're a complete beginner then you might be best off starting small and adding equipment as and when you need it, or even take a course to give you some experience, so that you'll have a better idea of that you want to buy.

    Pete
     

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