Beginner Photographer, Want to start with Film!

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by jofonandez, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. jofonandez

    jofonandez TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Burnaby
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hey folks, before I ask any questions allow me to introduce myself. My name is Jonah, I'm 22, and other than a point and shoot, I've never really touched a camera.

    I've decided to take up photography for a number of reasons, one being for a creative release, followed by the need for a hobby I can take advantage of irregular work hours with, and finally, because of my time working at a photography studio on the customer service end, more than anything I have been INSPIRED!

    I've decided I want to start with film, and REALLY dedicate myself and explore this side of photography before moving into anything digital. I know there are most likely multiple threads pertaining to this subject, but I haven't been able to find a definite answer for myself personally.

    I am looking to purchase my first (preferably used) camera. I have looked into the Pentax F1000, and the only thing I am worried about is the lens compatibility vs say a Nikon. (I have a friend who is absolutely dedicated to nikon and this may or may not have created a subconscious bias towards it for me as well :lol:) Granted I'll probably stick with one lens for a good amount of time as I learn the ropes, this may or may not be a problem.

    I have found the following on craigslist for $100: "Manual focus SLR Cameras, Pentax K-Type Lens mount 1-1/1000Sec.Shutter Speed with SMC Pentax-M .1:2 50mm Lense ". Please tell me if this is a rip off. I don't really have a budget as I'll be investing more and more as time goes on, but any suggestions on a good beginner set up would be helpful.

    There are a few photog courses I can take here, but due to my working hours it's almost impossible to find one I can consistently attend, thus I have decided that, for now, I will be doing my own research and trying to learn on my own.

    I'm excited to hear from experienced film photographers, and any help would be appreciated! As I said I do not have a set budget, and I am willing to spend, but a good beginner bang-for-my-buck set up would be ideal.

    Sorry for the super long post, I was super excited to register here and I'm planning on diving in head first, so bare with me!

    Thanks again,
    Jonah
     
  2. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,263
    Likes Received:
    189
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    At one time that camera was considered a great beginner learning camera. I would be a bit concerned about buying this camera without having it looked at and checked for shutter speeds, etc. YOu don't want to start off the learning curve with a problem camera. I am not saying this one has issues, but buying from someplace that offers a warranty may be a better busincess decsion.

    It can't use nikon lens.

    Because analog equipment is so available you may be able to find something "newer", check KEH for a price comparsion. THey have a great rep for down grading equipment that may have a BGN rating but looks and preforms as good or better.

    good luck and have lots of fun.
     
  3. Flash Harry

    Flash Harry TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,918
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Decent Nikon pro and semi pro film cameras can be bought for next to nothing now, I'd take a look at dealers second hand shelves before committing to a system which wont allow forward compatibility regards lens, most nik dslr's can use nearly all the lens in the nikon range so if you decide to "upgrade" to digital at a later date you should have campatable "glass". H
     
  4. jofonandez

    jofonandez TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Burnaby
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    That's awesome, yes I think I'll have a look at a few local shops around here. I'm excited to get going and want to have one in my hands asap!

    Thanks for the input guys, I may have a look at the pentax anyway just in case I want to experiment with it in the future, but I think I'll look into buying a nikon. Would there be any advantages with going with say an f100 over an f80 or f60? Or would the differences be minimal to a beginner like myself?
     
  5. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,263
    Likes Received:
    189
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    the f100 is considered to be better than the others you mentioned. they are consider consumer camera bodies, the f100 is moving into the prosumer area as the next step up is a pro body.
     
  6. jofonandez

    jofonandez TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Burnaby
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Ah, maybe I'll go that route then. I'm actually not opposed to starting with a more primitive camera if it helps me really learn things like aperture, f-stops and shutter speeds.

    Thanks for being so helpful guys, I guess the next step is to jump in and play around with everything. Sounds like a plan to me :)
     
  7. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,263
    Likes Received:
    189
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    nothing wrong with getting a pure basic camera as that really helps with learning imho, a camera with a computer chip with lots of whistles and bells can make things more confusing.

    the 100 certainly gives you a tool that would allow growth, the pentax more basic tools with can help speed up the learning process

    i have a 100 as well as a 90s but use them only on manual mode with none of the "whistle and bells" as that is how i have been doing things for a lot of years.
     
  8. NateS

    NateS TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2007
    Messages:
    2,753
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    Missouri
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I would suggest picking up a used F100 and maybe a 50mm f1.4 (older one) or a used 35-70 f2.8.

    If you truly want a throw back to a more simpler setup and a truly fun feel, pick up an FE2 or a FM2 for a true throwback to the olden days. I've been wanting an FE2 (and F100) for awhile now, but just too broke to jump into to film.

    I'd love to have an FE2, 50mm f1.4 and a few rolls of Delta 100 to run around with.
     
  9. j-dogg

    j-dogg TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2010
    Messages:
    526
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Flori-duh
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Nikkormat FTN, it was my learner and I still shoot it. NOTHING automatic, full manual you set everything yourself, plus it's a tank and you can find them for next to nothing.

    Best of all, Nikon glass, some of the lenses on it I use with my Nikon/EOS adapter on my Canon Digital Rebel.

    If you get an old film camera check the foam seals to make sure they are straight, although most cameras have seal kits you can buy on ebay, especially any of the Nikon F-series up to the F100.
     
  10. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Messages:
    2,925
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    And lot of us think the f100 is better then the pro body f5. F100's can be had for around $175 online. One nice thing about nikon is that you can use your lenses on their digital slrs as well, the d1h, d2x, d200, d300, d700, and d3 are all fully compatible with the old manual focus lenses--their cheaper digital bodies also work with them, but without metering.

    But you should reconsider your idea to learn on film... it's much easier to learn the basics on digital, as you have instant feedback and exposure data saved with each photo so you can tell what you did wrong/right.

    My recommendation is to get comfortable on digital, and then move to film later to advance your technique.
     
  11. Josh66

    Josh66 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    14,604
    Likes Received:
    1,236
    Location:
    Cedar Hill, Texas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    If you don't really want to go old school, you can get modern, pro level 35mm bodies cheap these days. Like Ann said - check KEH.com. You can pick up top-of-the-line bodies for less than $300. Their inventory changes frequently, so you may have to check in a few times if there's something specific you're looking for.
     
  12. MarkF48

    MarkF48 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Messages:
    106
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Excellent suggestion... I have a Canon Elan7 I purchased from KEH several years ago and it's nice to be able to use most of the lenses that I use on my Canon digital gear, at least the ones that are designed for full frame.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

beginner film photography

,

beginner film slr

,
best beginner film slr
,
how to start analog photography
,
how to start in film photography
,
how to start with analog photography
,
i want to start film photography
,
starting analog photography
,

starting film photography

,
starting film photography what slr kit to buy?