Best 70-200 lens for Nikon mount?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Live_free, Apr 21, 2010.

  1. Live_free

    Live_free TPF Noob!

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    Hey everyone I'm in the market for a new lens and as I want to shoot sports I've been looking into 70-200 lenses. Any recommendations? I'd buy either sigma or Nikon made lenses. Thanks all. If you have any you could post a sample pic you've taken with it, that would help a load. Thanks all.
     
  2. Josh220

    Josh220 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Sigma has a few "gems" out there but their 70-200 is not one of them. Go for the Nikon; you can still get the VRI new from B&H if you want to save $350. I'm getting the VRII :D
     
  3. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Nikon, all the way. Either the first generation or second generation model.
     
  4. Josh220

    Josh220 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I take back what I said about finding the VRI on B&H. Last night they still had it listed, but now it's labeled as discontinued.
     
  5. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Define best. Best in it's class, or best for you? Do you need VR? What about max reproduction ratio?

    The Nikkor AF-S 70-200 f/2.8 G VR II is about as good as it gets, but I'd be dammed if I'm going to pay the premium for that lens over the Nikkor AF 80-200 f/2.8D which will probably look optically the same on the pictures I take.
     
  6. Live_free

    Live_free TPF Noob!

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    I just looked at the VR II and I must say I just can't justify paying 2.2k for a lens.
     
  7. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I want some pro glass, but there is no way i can afford some of those. So i plan on getting the nikon 80-200 2.8 AF-D, the two ring one. You can pick it up used for about 900, and new for 1100. Seems pretty reasonable to me, compared the the 70-200. Its still pro glass, right?
     
  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    If you want a lens for sports shooting, you truly want a Nikon-made, genuine AF-S lens, that conforms to all Nikon focusing protocols, on all bodies. The difference between an 80-200 AF-D and an 80-200 AF-S (made only for a short time) and the two 70-200 AF-S models is that with an AF-S lens, the focusing distance can be calculated by the focusing system with incredible precision; with all the AF-D lenses, the focusing system uses an "adjust-and-compare,repeatedly" system of arriving at the right focusing point; with AF-S, the exact focusing distance needed can be predicted by the computer,and the in-lens focusing motor will drive the lens almost to the **EXACT** point of focus,using predictive focusing information--which is not how the AF-D lenses focus. On the lower-end Nikon bodies, like the D200 and D90, AF-D lenses have a decidedly slower focusing action than on the D1-D2-D3-D700 series, which have a better in-body focusing motor. On the lower-level Nikon bodies, an AF-D lens is at a decided disadvantage compared with the same AF-D lens on a top-tier body, and the lower-end and mid-range Nikon bodies benefit a lot from an AF-S lens. For any rapidly-moving subjects, an AF-S 70-200 will outperform the slower, non-predictive AF-D focusing lenses, especially under challenging focusing situations. There is also the lack of manual focusing override with an AF-D lens, and the need to manually disengage AF in order to do even a minor AF override with an AF-D lens.
     
  9. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    ^^ Thank you for that. I didnt know that, and that is interesting to learn.
     
  10. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Disregard, i reread the ending of ur post. Haha.

    And, which is better for a "lower end" body, such as my D200, or the OP's D90. From what you said, im guessing it would be the AF-S. Is there a significant enough difference between the two to make it worth the extra 200?
     
  11. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I think the pro-level AF-S Nikkor lenses are worth the additional cost. I have owned two of the 80-200 screwdriver-focusing lenses and also the 70-200 AF-S, the original model. There's nothing faster than a good, pro-level AF-S Nikkor lens when it comes to focusing speed and sureness, especially when you want to shoot action shots. With an AF-D lens, if the lens mis-focuses a bit, you have to disengage the AF system just to touch up the focus...with an AF-S lens, there is full-time manuakl focusing override on all of the "pro-level" AF-S lenses; Nikon's AF-S protocol has two levels; the "pro" AF-S lenses all have the original AF-S system with full time manual focusing override. A small sub-set of Nikkor lenses, like the really cheap, newest kit zooms that call themselves AF-S have an A/M switch and do not offer full-time manual focusing override.

    I don't mean to describe the D200 as low-end, but it was the last of the mid-level bodies that had the amateur/pro AF system distinction/differentiation: the D300 in 2007 was the first mid-priced Nikon to offer the top-level AF module (the 51-point AF module also used in the D3 and D700), while the D200 used the simpler, 11-area AF system, and also the D200 and other lower-level Nikons simply do not have the big, beefy AF motors and huge battery capacity of the $5,000 D1-D2-D3 series bodies...

    The fastest and easiest way to beef up the AF capability of a lower-end Nikon like a D50,D70,D80,D90,D100,Fuji S2, Fuji S5,D40,D60, is to slap a pro-grade AF-S Nikkor on there. On the Nikon big glass like the 70-200 VR, 200mm f/2, and 300/2.8 AFS-II or newer, the LENS ITSELF has a huge focusing advantage over any of the older AF-D lenses in terms of focusing speed, sureness, and the ability to simply touch up the focus, without the need to press a button and turn a ring, or to flip an A/M switch. The older screwdriver focusing lenses simply do not focus the same way as the new AF-S pro-level lenses; it's possible for those who have only new Nikon lower-level AF-S zooms to be unfamiliar with the full-time manual focusing override design of the older AF-S lenses and the new pro-level AF-S lenses. For a user who has only the 18-55 or the 55-200 kit, they might be unaware of how the older, and pro-level zooms offer FTM and also much faster, surer AF than the low-cost, slower-speed and newest kit zooms with this new cheapened AF-S system that relies on an A/M switch.
     
  12. jeph

    jeph TPF Noob!

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    Well I don't have any of this technical know-how but I do know that I rented a 70-200 VRII to go to an indy car race and after that experience I had to buy it. By the time that I uploaded the pics the quality went down but at 100% crop on my computer it is as sharp as I could want. Oh and the focus is stupid fast and right on.

    [​IMG]
     

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