Best Canon walk around lens?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by David A, Nov 11, 2005.

  1. David A

    David A TPF Noob!

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    Hey guys...I finally am getting a DSLR and I want to start investing in lenses. I have been reading some reviews and I think a good area to start may be the EF 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 USM...

    Does anyone have an alternative to this? All replies are appreciated... :)
     
  2. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    I didn't hear too many great things about that lens.

    Usually 28-135 is praised for excellent optical quality. 28-105 is so-so.

    If I were to start over, my first lens would be 50/1.8 It's HIGHLY UNLIKELY to be a bad choice for a first lens, unless you can afford 50/1.4 which costs 300 bucks and is worth every penny.

    50/1.8 and 35/2

    Good luck
     
  3. David A

    David A TPF Noob!

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    Oh, the 50mm 1.8 is with out a doubt the other lens I am going to pick up...it's a must...

    But you would suggest the 28-135 over the 28-105? I'll look more into it...thanks.

    I am mostly looking for a good walk around with a nice zoom range.
     
  4. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Today we think we have to have a zoom with a lot of range to get "the" shot. I fall into that trap as well. I have a lot of glass to choose from and to be honest by nature we are all lazy. When I bought my first SLR and then my first Nikon, I shot a "normal" lens for years. A 45 or 50mm lens is an ideal lens for a film or full frame camera. A 28 to 35mm lens is great for a clipped chip DSLR. You can't go wrong by learning your craft with a good normal lens. You won't find any glass any sharper.
     
  5. RickyN29

    RickyN29 TPF Noob!

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    What about the 17-85 USM IS? (For a 1.6x crop factored DSLR)

    Seems to be a great range. Fair price, supposedly great optics.

    That is what I was planning to get to replace my kit 18-55
     
  6. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    I think you nailed it for that lens. :lmao:

    I'd never buy it. Optically it's marginally better than 18-55... It costs as much as 17-40 L which is WAY better, can be used on full frame and has weather seals. And 17-85 can't be used on FF... where canon seems to be going right now.

    Image stabilization, three aspherical elements and USM makes it expensive... and marketing. But the quality is low and the lens is SLOW.

    For those money, you're much better off with a kit lens and primes like 35/2, 50/1.8 and 28/2.8 The quality with those lenses is simply STUNNING and they are classics.

    So don't buy into the marketing BS by chasing aspherical elements and buy "old triend and tested" You'll never regret it... especially when you start shooting in low light.
     
  7. RickyN29

    RickyN29 TPF Noob!

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    Dammit, really? I was set on buying that one. It really has the range I want, and I have incredibly shaky hands so I really need IS (had IS on another camera, made a huge difference)

    Grrrrr....why can't they make the lens I want!!!!! I loved my Canon 36-432mm IS on the S2 but yeah.....
     
  8. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    You have a dslr now... you don't need IS anymore

    1) The camera is bigger, and hence more stable. That adds a stop
    2) The lenses are generally faster. S2 is f/2.7-3.5 and that's pretty slow. If you use f/1.4 or f/2 you get 4-8 times higher shutter speeds
    3) On S2 IS you only get decent quality with ISO 50. In XT you can choose ISO 800 or even 1600 and still get printable results.

    Which means that on average, given fast lenses, your shutter speeds will be 8 to 128 times higher elliminating the need for IS... and of course you can get 70-200 f/2.8 IS too.

    And if that's not enough, get some support. You have a big boy's camera now - get a monopod and a tripod!
     
  9. RickyN29

    RickyN29 TPF Noob!

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    Got both a Tripod and Monopod, but sometimes they are not ideal to be used. I definitely love the ability to shoot higher ISOs, which helps, but from the 3000+ pics I have shot so far, at least twice the amount are throw aways with the SLR compared to the S2. The IS really worked wonders. Without using primes, those apertures are going to be only in some really expensive L lenses which are unfortunately out of my budget.

    I am not at all trying to say the S2 was a better camera, just that I miss the focal range and the IS.

    I should also add, I have a nerve problem in my hands, but no insurance or anything anymore, repairable supposedly, but I have learned to just deal with it. Although it has been embarrassing being made fun of by friends cause my hands shake pretty bad (I am only 22)

     
  10. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    I really don't know then. Maybe a flash? No amount of handshake can affect the sharpness then...

    But the pics would be flat then.
     
  11. RickyN29

    RickyN29 TPF Noob!

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    Well getting an IS lens for this camera should work out, I just have to find the right one.
     
  12. woodsac

    woodsac TPF Noob!

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    My primary walk around is the 17-85mm IS. The only time you here anything bad about this lens, is when someone compares it to 'L' glass. It's not L glass and you're only paying 1/3 of the price of L glass with IS. For the price and the IS function, it can't be beat!

    I rarely ever use a tripod, ever. The IS feature saves more photos than any fast lens could. I generate twice as many bad photos with my 50mm f/1.8 handheld. I am not a professional, so I can't justify spending $1500+ on a single lens. Especially not just a daily walk around. Granted the 17-40mm L is only about $700, it doesn't have IS (and it sounds like you would benefit from the IS).

    Almost every photo I've posted here was taken with the 17-85. It might not be up to the standards of some, but I guarantee that most would not know that I wasn't using L glass if I didn't say so. You can spend $8000 on the body and have $20,000 in lenses. That won't make you take good photos if you don't know how to use them. If you "walk around" with your camera and tripod every time you go out, you don't need the IS. Take it for what it's worth?
     

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