Best polarizer

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by bill04, Feb 24, 2008.

  1. bill04

    bill04 TPF Noob!

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    Hey,


    What do you recommend... a circular that fits my sigma 10-20, and is good for wide angle, and can be used with a step-down ring for my 18-200VR? I'd like to spend ~$100. I don't know the quality difference between the premium brands.
     
  2. pm63

    pm63 TPF Noob!

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    Funny you should ask this, I was just reading this on Ken Rockwell's page:

    http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/filters.htm

    He doesn't specify what he classifies as a wide angle lens, but I'd assume 10mm is a no-no?
     
  3. kidchill

    kidchill TPF Noob!

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    I second that...I've read that too, but not sure where. It kinda sucks 'cause you often want a polarizer on landscape shots.
     
  4. Socrates

    Socrates TPF Noob!

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    The best available is the Hoya "Pro-1" series. As the others have indicated, a polarizer is not a good idea for wide angle (10-20mm). Also, using a step-down ring will prevent you from attaching a lens hood, especially important with any filter because the glass is flat (compared with the curved surface of a lens).
     
  5. pm63

    pm63 TPF Noob!

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    So if I were to use a polarizer on an 18-55mm at 18mm, would this be a bad idea? Or should I try out different focal lengths and see at which point I eliminate the black patches in the sky? It's a bit of a pain, seeing as you often want wide angle on landscape.

    Also, what do you mean by it preventing you from attaching a lens hood, is a lens hood important? What does this have in relation to flat filters/curved glass?

    Thanks.
     
  6. McManniss

    McManniss TPF Noob!

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    Want a good pola, get a B+W Circular Pola. Made with Schneider glass, some of the best available.
     
  7. kundalini

    kundalini Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If you rely on Rockwell for all your information, you will miss out on much, much more that is out there and valid *read: factual*.

    After much research, I got this B+W Slim CPL for my 12-24mm. Get the slim for wide angle lenses. No vignetting that I have noticed. Superb filter IMO.
     
  8. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    A high quality polarizing filter can be used on an Ultra Wide lens with some care. I have used my Heliopan Kaeseman Circular Polarizing filteron a Canon 10-22 at 10mm with satisfying results. It does however take a lot of work to keep from getting that varying blue color to the sky. Not something I would recommend, but it can be done.
     
  9. bill04

    bill04 TPF Noob!

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    What makes that BW different than the $90 version?
     
  10. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    There is more to a polarizing filter than there is to most other filters. The quality of the polarizing foil is most important - it should have a dramatic reduction of light in one polarization direction, and little reduction of light polarized at 90 degrees to that, and those effects need to be even across the spectrum.

    Because this type of polarizing filter is a lamination of glass and polarizing foil, the lamination process needs to be of high quality both optically and mechanically. There is also a difference in the nature and quality of the coating - for example B+W MRC (multi resistant coating) is a good, durable multicoating process.

    B+W have a few grades of filter. Kaesemann MRC is probably the best. As far as I know they use Schott glass.

    Best,
    Helen
     

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