Black and White Beyond Kodak and Ilford

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by blackdoglab, Mar 23, 2007.

  1. blackdoglab

    blackdoglab yeah I'm easy.... but I'm not cheap

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    Hey,
    I've just jumped head first into processing my own black and white, and I absolutely love it. I've used both Kodak and Ilford and like the results, but I'm lookin' for something a wee bit diffrent. I want to find films with older emulsions that are a bit grainer. I've heard good things about films like Foma and Lucky and am seeking advice on their qualities, look, and anything else that comes to mind.

    Thanks
     
  2. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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    You might want to try Efke/Adox, they are older style films. I've only used the 25 so it's not very grainy but a higher speed might give the results you want.

    Dave
     
  3. JC1220

    JC1220 TPF Noob!

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    Adox, which use to be marketed as Efke and still offered by some places as such, would be the place to start. http://www.jandcphoto.com/ stocks it, however they are reorganizing right now. Others have started picking up the products like http://www.freestylephoto.biz/

    I would also look into Bergger sold through Freestyle or go to http://www.bergger.com/
    FOMA films would also be a choice in this case as well.

    Now, just because it is older emulsion style does not equate it to increased grain, much will depend on developer as well. Also, simply pushing films and/or increasing development time will increase grain in most cases. It is choosing the right film and developer.
     
  4. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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  5. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    Adox, Efke, Maco, and Rollei are in almost all cases the same films. Bergger is nice, but in 120, the paper is rather thick and my 645 insert has a hard time with it. Foma is nice...similar to Kodak plus-x; has that blue-tinge. Lucky is absolute crap. Don't waste your money on it. Nobody mentioned Fuji for some reason. Neopan 1600 anyone?

    And as JC noted, older emulsion does not mean more grain. In fact, none of the finest-grained b&w films ever made were t-grained (PanX, TP, APX25).

    Edit: I could be wrong about TP, though I'm sure of the other two. I'll double check.
     
  6. blackdoglab

    blackdoglab yeah I'm easy.... but I'm not cheap

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    Thanks folks,
    I just ordered some foma and agfa from Freestyle. Thanks for the advice. I think I might try infrared next.
     
  7. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Huh? Whazzat yer say? Grain, yer say? ? Yer say yer wants grain?

    Push Tri-X and whack it with Dektol!
     
  8. blackdoglab

    blackdoglab yeah I'm easy.... but I'm not cheap

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    Simmer down buddy, I'm just not satisfied with Ilford or kodak so I'm tryin' some old school emulsions. Heck, if I want grain, I'll make a bromoil print or use asa 1600.
     
  9. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    I think you're misusing the word emulsion. Ilford and Kodak both make a number of "old school emulsions," including tri-x, plus-x, and FP4 among others.
     
  10. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I would venture a guess that Tri X has been on the market a lot longer than any of these others. I'm not sure I understand the term "old school emusion" either.
     
  11. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Just talking about older or different emulsions that have not been as reengineered over the years as Kodak & Ilford. I think the current version of Tri X is about 5-8 years old. I believe it now has a finer grain.
     
  12. blackdoglab

    blackdoglab yeah I'm easy.... but I'm not cheap

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    Exactly! I like to play with my film and photography, and have found that Kodak doesn't quite cut it for me. Put it to ya this way, I like things low tech and simple (for heaven's sake, I use a Zenit) and I like a chance to experiment. More often than not, I feel that photography has become a bit sanitized by the advent of digital. I'm not anti digital (I scan my negatives and use photoshop), but I can't see that digital is all that much better for what I want to do. I've had too many experiences (fortunately not on this forum) with people trying to shove a dslr down my throat. One memorable experience ended up with a feller telling me to shoot in color and then convert it to black and white. That would've been fine, but I wanted real black and white negatives. Another time I was at a camera shop and asked a clerk if they had kits or papers for cyanotypes. He very snydely told me just to adjust the color in photoshop over to cyan. Granted that these are experiences more with poor customer service, but it left me a bit bruised. To me, digital and film are both tools with each having distinct advantages over the other. I found that my tool belt is a hybrid one that is partial to film. Now, with that being said, I'm grateful to all of you to responding to me and helping in my decision making. This (and my local camera shop) have been the two places that have really inspired me.
     

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