Black & White - Digital or film?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Mr Fish, Jun 11, 2004.

  1. Mr Fish

    Mr Fish TPF Noob!

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    I want to do some black & White work. I have both digital and film cameras but would like your advice and comments on the pros and cons of both formats when doing b&w.

    My initial concern is that the digital will need to much fiddling to get them converted correctly.

    With regards to film what would you suggest? the principle subjects are likely to be candids.
     
  2. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

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    Film. Ilford HP5+ is a 400 speed, pretty versatile and reliable.
     
  3. voodoocat

    voodoocat ))<>(( Supporting Member

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    If you shoot black and white film and plan on doing candid portraits, I recommend a yellow or yellow/green filter. I like the way it renders flesh tones better than straight black and white.
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    FILM.

    I like slower speed film, like TMax 100 or something along those lines. And try those filters like Voodoo recommended, throwing in a deep orange if you do landscape stuff with a lot os sky showing.

    Don't forget to post your finished product here, too! Have fun! :D
     
  5. Mr Fish

    Mr Fish TPF Noob!

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    Thanks.

    I had already considered using an orange filter.

    how does kodas tri-x compare with the Ilford HP5?
     
  6. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait TPF Noob!

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    If you're wanting a bunch of b&w stuff, I'd go with film (ack, did I just say that?!). While not difficult to convert color to b&w and make it look just as good as b&w film, it does take some time to get the technique down.
     
  7. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    I agree with Shark on this one. While PS does a good job it just ain't the same for some reason.
     
  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Either can probably do the job. You should look at examples of BW prints from film and digital and see which you prefer. They have a different look; not better or worse, just different. If you want a classic look, you should probably go with film. But watch out, depending on how you are having them printed many labs are scanning the film and printing it digitally, so that could defeat the purpose anyway.
     
  9. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait TPF Noob!

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    Nah, I'll match up some of my digitally converted b&w stuff against film b&w any day. It's just that it's a shot-by-shot process for me, much more involved than simply desaturating and being done. For large numbers of b&w shots, probably easier and quicker to go film.
     

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