Bokeh....

Discussion in 'Photographic Discussions' started by cherrymoose, Aug 19, 2007.

  1. cherrymoose

    cherrymoose TPF Noob!

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    ...should be considered a real word on Firefox.
     
  2. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    did I miss something?
     
  3. cherrymoose

    cherrymoose TPF Noob!

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    Not that I know of.
     
  4. DSLR noob

    DSLR noob TPF Noob!

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    random rant... shot, simple...... I disagree though. Bokeh is Japanese, if firefox used every language out there, we'd never see words with errors, the world is too diverse.
     
  5. cherrymoose

    cherrymoose TPF Noob!

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    Yeah, it was just a tiny little rant. :p

    You have a point-- but most dictionaries use it, and dictionaries don't have every Japanese word either.
     
  6. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Kindergarten works so why should a Japanese word that has been incorporated into common English not?
     
  7. "Bokeh" is hardly a common word - in fact I would consider it highly technical. Even half the people on this forum don't know what it means, but I can guarantee you that my mom knows "Kindergarten."
     
  8. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I recall read in Shutterbug that “boken” is an American spelling and not the Japanese western style alphabet spelling
     
  9. The_Traveler

    The_Traveler Completely Counter-dependent Supporting Member

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    Firefox or Thunderbird?
     
  10. crownlaurel

    crownlaurel TPF Noob!

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    LOL, "boken" is what happens when my three year old throws a toy and it ends up in two or more pieces. :greenpbl:
     
  11. DSLR noob

    DSLR noob TPF Noob!

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    true

    the original Japanese spelling (well it's symbols, but in roomaji or roman lettering to sound out symbols) it's "boke" pronounced bow-keh (almost like kay but with a short e)
     
  12. kelley_french

    kelley_french TPF Noob!

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    For those who did not know!

    Bokeh
    (from the Japanese boke ぼけ, "blur") is a photographic term referring to distorted out-of-focus areas in an image produced by a camera lens.[1] Different lens bokeh produces different aesthetic qualities in out-of-focus backgrounds, which are often used to reduce distractions and emphasize the primary subject.
     

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