Bracketing

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ajmall, Jun 15, 2005.

  1. ajmall

    ajmall TPF Noob!

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    Where's a good place to read up about bracketing?
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Right here :D

    Bracketing is simply taking additional photos of a scene at different exposure values to ensure that you get the shot or to give you more than one take on the scene.

    Basically, meter the scene and take a photo. Then adjust the exposure up (or down) and take another photo, then adjust the exposure down (or up) and take yet another photo.

    The amount that you adjust the exposure is up to you. Could be as little as 1/3 of a stop or even two stops either way. You could even bracket with multiple shots, two higher and two lower...etc.

    That's bracketing in a nut shell.
     
  3. KevinR

    KevinR TPF Noob!

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    As Mike said, thats about it to bracketing. Some cameras can be set up to do the bracketing or do it manually. I don't bracket much now, but when I was shooting alot of slide film, I would shoot with the camera meter and move a full step up and a full step down. I would bracket down a couple of steps if I where shooting snow or high sunlight water. Sometimes it depends on what the subject is to know how much to bracket.
     
  4. wharrison

    wharrison TPF Noob!

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    In addition to what's been said, I would suggest that you find several books on the basics of photography with a large, illustrative section on exposure measurement.

    As far as "bracketing" itself is concerned, you could read Ansel Adams' book on the topic, but then you'd probably start talking about taking "Calculated Safety Shots". ;>)

    One of the more interesting and still valuable books on photography - at least, "seeing" photographically, is "The Eye of Eisenstaedt" by Alfred Eisenstadt, one of the original photographers for Life magazine. Part biographical, part photographic "seeing" and part technical.

    Although it is out of print, copies should be available through your local public library or through either or the two web sites below.

    abe.com (American Book Exchange)

    alibris.com

    Both are excellent resources of good used and new books, etc.

    Hope this is somewhat useful.

    Bill
     

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