Brightness

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ZERO, Mar 20, 2004.

  1. ZERO

    ZERO TPF Noob!

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    Anyone care to judge which of these two copies has the better brightness level.


    #1
    [​IMG]

    #2
    [​IMG]
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    #1 has better contrast (IMHO)

    #2 doesn't seem to have any true black, and overall seems a little flat and low contrast.

    Both have similar highlights. I'm looking at the lichen on the rocks. In both photos it's almost white with a hint of texture. To me this means that both are equally bright, it's just the shadows that are different. But I may not know the technical definition of "brightness".
     
  3. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I like the top one, but I would dodge the lower right corner.

    BTW, its best to set your levels first and use curves to adjust contrast instead of using brightness/contrast. It tends to loose information.
     
  4. ZERO

    ZERO TPF Noob!

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    thanks guys.
    #2 is just a red herring really - i'm fixated with peoples monitor brightness
    at the moment lol. after i made #1 i just adjusted brightness +20% in
    'BRIGHTNESS CONTRAST' just to lighten it up, hence my topic
    tagged "Brightness. I figured if (my preferred) #1 is said to be too dark,
    people would maybe comment on #2 being not as dark...anyway..

    so everyone's process, say ...for a scanned monochrome neg data

    1 open TIFF.
    2 fit to screen (black background) - crop any light edges.
    3 (grey background) - crop any dark edges.
    3 channel mix: monochrome, R+G+B balance.
    *Save .PSD*
    4 burn & dodge (undo + fade%).
    5 adjust image size and or canvas size.
    5 KPT equaliser. (undo+ fade%).
    6 curves (which usually is just manually locating the cursor
    near-as-dammit back on the central-point).

    (7 with grainy exposures it can improve things a bit to use Apply Image
    with modes: multiply , overlay, soft light - to a % degree).

    any good reasons to rearrange or expand this sequence, are appreciated !

    I find myself 'mixing down' my short listed images several times over
    a series of days to discover what makes them what they are.

    what im seeking is the very best process which i can develop to give
    quality detail and finish with some inviduality of production, but within a
    profitable and quantified turnaround time vis commercial projects.

    I'm getting CDs of my negs to review. I work what i can into
    somekind of offerable product. i dont want to churn things out as such,
    but im trying my best to perfect and efficient and quality process which
    allows me to prep 10-20 images in 6-8 hours.


    :0)
     
  5. ZERO

    ZERO TPF Noob!

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    Lichens
    yeah ,The sun was low opposite and behind me to the right. it's a winter sun situation with that cold high cloud.

    I try not to bother with 'contrast' adjusters as such. It's too often used
    a bit harshly.
     

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