Bug Garden photo's. Don't look if you don't like creepy crawlies!

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Euphillia, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. Euphillia

    Euphillia TPF Noob!

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    I took my camera to the KSU bug garden yesterday and took a TON of photos. biggest issue with most was the glare on the glass, but I am not using a macro lens and I had an issue holding the lens to the glass and getting it to focus. Sucked.

    I got some good ones(not great) and would like to get some C&C for when I try for round 2 in a couple of weeks. Yes I know there is some glare, but I chose photos that it isn't like "in your face glare" thanks for the detailed feedback.

    1. [​IMG]

    2. [​IMG]

    3. [​IMG]

    4. [​IMG]

    5. [​IMG]

    6. [​IMG]

    these last 2 are tarantulas I purchased and I get to take A LOT more photos
    of.


    7. [​IMG]

    8. [​IMG]
     
  2. Euphillia

    Euphillia TPF Noob!

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    are they that bad? 51 views, 7 hours of being here and no CC.
     
  3. tdiprincess

    tdiprincess TPF Noob!

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    I really like number 3 and 5.. unique shots. You may be able to process out the glare, but I'm too new to that to help much..
     
  4. pony

    pony TPF Noob!

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    For me #7 is close, the others the focus seems just a bit off...like in #3 the focus is on the jelly jar and not on the bug.
    Cool subjects though!
    I have no advice on shooting through glass though, wish I did :)
     
  5. billy_the_kid43

    billy_the_kid43 TPF Noob!

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    +1
    I agree about the focus and that #7 is the best of them. Would like to see more pics of the two you purchased in the future.
     
  6. Euphillia

    Euphillia TPF Noob!

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    Thanks guys.
     
  7. dyyylan

    dyyylan TPF Noob!

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    I'd give you a real critique but I couldn't stand to look at them long enough D:
    Sorry!
     
  8. Live_free

    Live_free TPF Noob!

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    I think they are just ohh look at the subject rather then an actual trying picture. Nice chondro you have there.
     
  9. Euphillia

    Euphillia TPF Noob!

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    I think comments like this are best left in your head. They are not helpful in any way to anyone who is learning. This the BEGINNER forum. I guess your mother never taught you the saying, " if you have nothing nice to say, then don't say anything at all"

    If you are going to critique someone, actually try to leave something that might be used so that next time you WILL want to look at photos.
     
  10. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Euphillia I have a feeling that whilst dyyylan's post might appear offensive in wording, the track record of this member is not hostile. So I suspect that they were trying to be tongue-in-cheek with the post and were refering to the spiders (and a fear of them on a part of theirself) the "D:" at the end being a web lable for a smilie to try and carry this across.
    I am not saying this in defence nor for any reason other than that is my impression of their post.

    Right now onto the crits!

    First off do please have a look at this thread here:
    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/...e-your-posts-get-critiques-your-work-c-c.html
    to get some pointers on posting images so that you can provide the most information so that people have it to hand to be able to give you the most constructive feedback on your work


    Shot 1:
    ISO 800 f4

    You have flash and appear to be using it (according to the EXIF reader I have) so you probably could have lowerd the ISO down to say ISO 400 or even 200 which would have given you far less noise in your shots. It's not showing at websize, and they look like fairly solid and bright exposures so its probably not too bad fullsize, but it would give you an overall quality improvement.
    Secondly I have had a hard time working out if the eye in this snake shot is in focus or not and I have a feeling that the focus is locked onto the body of the snake that is closest to the camera and then the small depth of field at f4 is just catching the eye, but not quite. I would also say that this shot is a tad overbright in the middle areas and toning this down a little would give you a bit of help. You could also selectivly boost the contrast around the eye and face area of the snake to make them appear a little sharper.

    Shot 2
    ISO 800 f3.5
    Back end of spider ;) It's a decent presentation of if and you have that fine, interesting webbing captured in the shot, but I would have prefered to see the face of the spider in question. A record shot more than anything I feel

    Shot 3
    ISO 800 f4
    Focus appears to have missed the insect in this shot and captured the glass bottle instead - although again I think the brightness of the insect is hiding some sharpness present - toning that down a tiny bit and boosting contrast again might show that the insect is morein focus than we expect. Certianly when compared to the glass the insect appears to be soft of the majority of its main body/leaf.

    Shot 4
    ISO 800 f4
    This shot has a much more pleasing presentation with no realy harh areas of brightness which makes for a much more pleasant viewing experience.

    Shot 5 and 6
    ISO 800 f5
    Cheater!! ;) I can see the pins!
    Both are neat record shots of the insects and you've got the focus right on thier backs

    Shot 7
    ISO 800 f5.6
    Ahh what a change! I'm going to say this is easily the best shot in the series. For starters you focus is far better placed than in many, its right on the eyes of this big spider and with any animal shot the focus on the eyes is about the only "rule" that you can't break. There is a muddy spot and a hazy zone in the right corner and I would be tempted to crop away some of that side just to lessen those distractions - don't crop too close to his leg on that side, but just a bit.

    Shot 8
    ISO 400 f5
    The ISO lowers - and you have some evil beastie starting right at you as you invade his little webbed home. A cute shot I have to say (yes the spider is giving a cute look) and the eyes look to be just in focus.


    Overall: Overall you've had a tricky shooting environment that has not helped in capturing the images, however there are a few things you can do to help yourself out:

    1) Focus - you say you were having trouble getting a focus lock at close distances and in this lighting, and its not too surprising. I would personally say if the AF is not being reiable in such an environment shift to using manual focus. I know its not the best on kit lenses, but its at least a little more accurate. Also it might help you place that depth of field exactly where you want it as a few shots here have suffered from incorrectly placed focus. I am guessing that you were using all the AF points and letting the camera pick the AF point? If so then also move down to using just the central AF point on the camera - you can then point and tell the camera exactly what you want in focus (you can also use the separate points around the edge, though bare in mind that in entry level camera bodies these are lesser AF sensors and might struggle - the middle is the best and will give you the fastest and most accurate results).

    2) Depth of field - f4 and 5.6 area a little small for such subjects at these close ranges. Even though the backgrounds are not very interesting and often contain human elements I would have stopped a little further down just to give abit more depth to each insect. You can't hide those background areas easily unless you can get in much closer so f6.3 won't be showing up too much more background distractions.

    3) ISO - already mentioned that getting this down might very well help you - remember that when you use flash the camera is not able to know how it will affect the scene and so the shutter speed rating is still based only on the ambient lighting. Shift to manual and dail in the settings (say ISO 200, 1/200sec and the aperture of your choice) and see if the flash can give enough light - if so then keep shooting like that - if not swap and change the settings till it does. That way you can still have a good shutter speed and aperture without having to use high ISOs all the time.

    4) I've said quite a few here were record shots and whilst I hate the term I have to stand by it - you've tried some good angles in early shots to try and move away from being overly central but the environment has been your worst opponent here.

    5) Flash and glass (or plastic) cages is a tricky area and can cause all kinds of reflection problems - one trick is to get as close as you can and to also affix a square of black cardboard around the edge of the lens so that reflections are at a minimum - however if you were using the popup flash this is not easily possible as its so close to the body of the camera.
    Another good method is to use a circular polarizing filter - set to the right angle it will counter reflections from a reflective surface like glass. On the downside however it will take away two stops of ligth and so makes the viewfinder image noticably darker and also means there is less light for an exposure.
     
  11. Euphillia

    Euphillia TPF Noob!

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    Overead, thank you, thank you, thank you! By far the best feedback I have received here and I feel like I have posted and actually learned something. It is very much appreciated.
     
  12. Bitter Jeweler

    Bitter Jeweler Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Heh. I think dyyylan meant they are too creepy to look at for too long.
    I feel the same way about the spiders.
    *shudders*
     

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