bulk loading film

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Bobby Ironsights, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. Bobby Ironsights

    Bobby Ironsights TPF Noob!

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    Hi,
    I'm new to photography, and want to start developing my own film, (B&W) and loading my own film cassettes.

    I've decided to order my stuff from adorama, and so am about to purchase a developing tank (single reel, stainless steel) weighted film clips, and a changing bag.

    Also; a watson 35 mm bulk film loader, and 10 reloadable plastic cassettes.

    Adorama only sells two sizes of changing bag however, Small (16x17). and extra large 36" x 43".

    I'm a largish man, with fairly large hands, but the price on the small is tempting.

    However; I have never seen a roll of bulk film, so I'm thinking the small might be too small to fit all the stuff in there that I need for loading cassettes.

    Any suggestions?

    Also, is the film squeegee really neccessary? They don't ship it to Canada for whatever reason. :grumpy:

    Also, are there any other doo-dads that I should be buying with my first order?

    Thank you all for your time;
    Bobby.
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    A roll of 100' of film is about as big around as a roll of masking tape, but thicker. You only need the changing bag to load the bulk loader. Once the film is in the loader, loading the cassettes can be done in the light.
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I never use film squeegees. I call them film destroyers. They are excellent at creating long scratches that run through every frame.

    I've been using my fingers for 15 years. Some might caution about that too, but I've never had a problem.
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I agree with Matt about the film squeegees not really being necessary. I don't bother with anything at all, frankly. After development/final wash, I use 2 drops of LFN in the tank with fresh water and agitate very gently for a minute or so. Then hang to dry with the clips weighting down the strip. I do not have any problems with water streaks this way.

    I'm assuming you have the developer, fixer, and storage bottles as needed for your stock mixes. I recommend the collapsable kind. A thermometer might be useful. You can get inexpensive measuring cups elsewhere.

    You should be in business; developing film is easy and doesn't take a lot of supplies.

    Have fun; welcome to TPF, btw. :)
     
  5. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  6. Bobby Ironsights

    Bobby Ironsights TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for all the responses!
    :thumbup:

    I feel much more confident now.

    Bobby.
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Yeah, I only use my fingers to squeegee 35mm film, I don't worry about it with 120 or 4x5. I just use some Photoflo in the last rinse, and hang to drip dry.
     
  8. RacePhoto

    RacePhoto TPF Noob!

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    I was hestitating to answer because I thought I might have an answer beyond my normal stupid level. It's been years, so I was going to suggest PhotoFlo, which works fine. I just wasn't sure if it was still made? :thumbup:

    Ya, that squeegie shipping ban to Canada is just to protect you. :er: I'd have a hard time figuring out what that is all about. Honest. But at least you can buy a good Cuban cigar if you wanted one.

    Here's a tip, from the past. As you use chemicals, especially developer, there's an air space in the bottle. Drop in glass marbles to take up the space so your developer doesn't oxidize and go bad. By reducing the air volume, you have longer shelf life.

    I used to buy some Illford film now and then, because it had black plastic canisters that were threaded on the end, instead of press fit. Watch the end caps on the reusable cans, because they are supposed to come off, but if they aren't tight, they will do just that, when you don't want them to. Maybe someone still makes film in cans that are re-usable. Free is good.

    Have a good time. There was nothing more fun (before digital of course) than going out and shooting a football game, coming back to the lab, developing the film and making contact sheets, to inspect, and printing a nice big 8x10 of something I liked. You are hands on the process from the start to the finish.

    Somehow I remember hanging film on a wire, coming down from the ceiling, with a film clip on one end and a weighted clip on the other end, and using a hair dryer, on low or no heat, to dry my film, with no spots. :confused: (no squeegee in other words)

    Do they still make HC100? It was the most forgiving, general purpose developer around. Then you can go hard core an push film to 3 or 4 times it's speed with Acufine or shoot high contrast copy film at iso 8 and develop it in Dektol. :lmao:

    Wild party ahead.
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Excellent tip with the marbles. I've found that glass beads at a crafts store are often cheaper than marbles.

    I use a thin strip of masking tape at each end of the cassette after it's loaded to make sure it doesn't pop open.
     

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