C&C Aspen Grove

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by three_eyed_otter, Jul 26, 2008.

  1. three_eyed_otter

    three_eyed_otter TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    Please post some comments...TIA.

    have a good one
    3Eo
     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Technically, it's a nice image, but appears slightly over-exposed. I'd like to see the tree trunks a little whiter. The composition is text-book perfect as far as the rule of thirds go; you have three nice horizontal bands (The lowest green area, the middle trunk area, and the upper sky area). Vertically, you have the one leafy tree at the 1/3 point image right... BUT I'm afraid it doesn't really do much for me; there's nothing to hold my attention. What did you want from this image? What do you see in it?
     
  3. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Its very flat, no depth. No real subject either, its just there...
     
  4. Jedo_03

    Jedo_03 TPF Noob!

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    I think TiredIron meant under exposed...
    TiredIron - your Iron Tired...???
    This is my take after levels and curves - nathin fancy...
    Compositionally, the image is okay - I just don't see what you are seeing.
    Maybe I'm not a grove person.
    You sure these are willows..???
    """aspen

    Any of three tree species of the genus Populus, of the willow family: P. tremula (the common European aspen), P. tremuloides (the American quaking, or trembling, aspen), and P. grandidentata (the American big-tooth aspen). Native to the Northern Hemisphere, aspens are known for the fluttering of their leaves in the slightest breeze. Aspens grow farther north and higher up the mountains than other Populus species. All aspens have a smooth, gray-green bark, random branching, rich green leaves that turn brilliant yellow in fall, and catkins that appear before the leaves in spring."""
    Jedo
     

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  5. three_eyed_otter

    three_eyed_otter TPF Noob!

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    Jedo_03--I like your version better than mine...


    I agree w/all 3 of the comments...Here's the deal. That photo was taken @ about 9000 ft. elev. in the Rocky Mtns. In person the grove was this amazing looking anomaly because it is essentially dead amongst thriving vegetation. Somehow the photo I took failed to capture the essence of the scene...
    Thanks for the honest comments they were quite on par w/what I suspected of the photo...

    have a good one
    3Eo
     
  6. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    He most certainly did, and yes, I think it must be....
     
  7. Donald Harvey

    Donald Harvey TPF Noob!

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    This might have been a cool idea if you get the chance to swing by those trees again. Go right to the tree line and take a Depth shot, and see how deep you can get into the trees.

    I want to say that that picture is located in Northern States. I visit Minnesota all the time and see trees exactly like that.
     

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