Camera for class?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Ihaveaquestion, Mar 31, 2005.

  1. Ihaveaquestion

    Ihaveaquestion TPF Noob!

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    I need a 35mm film camera for a college class I'm taking in the Fall.

    I think the Nikon N75 is the camera I need but I'm not sure?

    Im saposed to find one with manual metering mode and shutter controls.

    I'm having trouble finding one with these options listed?


    Thanks.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Just about any SLR will have those options these days. The N75 does.

    The specs for a camera will usually list the different modes it has. Newer cameras will have a big list of modes...landscape, portrait, night etc. Basically all you need are the 4 basic modes. Program (full auto), Aperture priority, shutter priority and full manual. For a photography class, they just want you to be able to adjust both the shutter speed and the aperture.

    If you do get the Nikon N75, I would suggest getting a 50mm F1.8 lens. It should be less than $100 and will probably be a better learning tool than the lens that typically comes with the camera.

    I would also suggest looking at a one of the Canon Rebel models. Basically the same as the Nikon. See which one feels best in your hands and feels easy to reach the controls. I would also suggest a 50mm F1.8 lens to go with a Canon Camera.

    Buying a new camera is nice (it's fun to buy new stuff) but it's also good because the lenses & accessories will be compatible if & when you decide to upgrade to a better camera or a digital SLR camera. On the other hand, you could get an older used SLR camera for a very good price. Sometimes it's better to learn with a camera that is simple without all the bells & whistles that new ones have.

    Good luck with your course.
     
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  3. Ihaveaquestion

    Ihaveaquestion TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Man! :D
     
  4. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Pentax K1000 is a good second hand model to look for. It's built like a brick toilet, will do everything you need and you can pick one up cheap.
     
  5. panocho

    panocho TPF Noob!

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    Totally agree. I'd go for a manual. I think that's the best option to learn. You'll have a clear sense of how you're controlling all what the camera does. A N75 or a Rebel will make not so obvious your control of the camera.

    Besides, you can get very good MF SLRs second hand for very little money.

    Enjoy your course!
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    If you do go for a modern auto-focus 35mm SLR, like an N-75, Rebel, etc..., make sure it has the ability to use some sort of cable release or remote shutter release, and if you think you might be bulk loading film make sure it has the ability to set the ISO. For some reason Nikon, and some other brands, have left these basic, yet possibly important features off some of their more recent, cheaper SLRs.
     
  7. photogoddess

    photogoddess TPF Noob!

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    Canon seems to have a different cable release for each model. I have to have a different one for my Rebel 2000, my A2 and my 10D. I don't know about the N75 but I do know that the N80 takes a standard cable release. If you're not going with an older manual model, the N80 would be my pick hands down.
     
  8. Ihaveaquestion

    Ihaveaquestion TPF Noob!

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    I dont know what "bulk loading film" and "cable release or remote shutter release" are? :confused:

    Can you guys let me know alittle more about these and how important they are.

    I want to get the right one.
     
  9. panocho

    panocho TPF Noob!

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    bulk film is one that doesn't come in cartridges (is this the word you use in English :blushing: ) but you put it yourself there. It is a way to save on film, since bulk film is cheaper, obviously. If you don't know what it is, I don't think you will use it.
    a cable release is a cable (of course!) that you connect to the camera to shot without pressing the shutter release button. It's normally used when having the camera on a tripod (if you press the button, all the stability that the tripod gives you is ruined), for long (bulb: 'B' speed) exposures, etc
    It is useful, but you can more or less manage without one if your camera gives you the option of a 2 second release (you know, that one you use to be yourself in the pictures, but with 2 seconds instead of the typical 10 -so that you don't have to wait that long).

    But again, it would be much better if your camera has all this that has been suggested. And, again, a fully manual gives you that. Go for one and you won't regret having learned photography fully manual! ;)
     
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  10. panocho

    panocho TPF Noob!

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    by the way, how do you like my wonderful definitions? :lol:

    I'll try to improve it... "a cable release is a cable that releases... the shutter"
    Great, isn't it :lmao: and yet it works! :mrgreen:
     
  11. youyesyou

    youyesyou TPF Noob!

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    i'm starting college next year and i'm going to be studying photography too! i ended up picking up a canon ae-1 program off of ebay for a mere $50 bucks. i got a macro lens, a wide angle lens, a zoom lens, and a few filters too. the total came out at just over $100. i highly recommend it. i did some research on it before i bought it and a lot of people hold it highly as a perfect college camera. i can see why too. all the pictures i've taken with it have come out wonderfully.

    i also suggest that you check out your school's website to see what all it is that they suggest you get. you're more than likely going to have to buy more equipment than just a camera and a few lenses.
     
  12. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    I'd say that you should get something very reliable as you don't want a camera to fail during your course. IMHO a N or F75 will probably not last the course if you're shooting a lot of film. It certainly won't survive the odd drop on the floor, in a puddle, rain or any kind of heavy treatment. Therefore....

    As Hertz quite rightly says the K1000 is a good place to start. It's probably the world's most popular teaching 35mm SLR because it has what you need and no more (it can be very daunting when the camera is "clever").

    I would strongly advise starting with any good brand classic SLR and one 50mm standard lens. This shouldn't cost you any serious money, shouldn't get stolen and most importantly should take the best pictures!

    Marques to try out should probably include:

    Pentax LX, K1000 or Spotmatic
    Nikon F3, FM3a, FM2n or FE
    Canon (err.. don't know Canon well! Ask someone else!)

    The first models are quite expensive (probably $500ish) then mid-rangeish (probably $175) and the third cheapish ($50).

    There are also other manufacturers who make good value kit, such as Olympus and Minolta, however these are less prevelant in the classic camera shops.

    Buy with a 50mm fixed manual-focus f1.8 or f1.4 lens if possible. Try and get a branded "standard" 50mm lens made by the manufacturer of the camera for good results. No long zooms, funky effects filters or other confusion until you've got the basics under control!!

    Good luck with your course!

    Rob
     

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