Camera recommendations

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Thetrevolution, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. Thetrevolution

    Thetrevolution TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm looking to get an SLR that is not too pricy. The main thing I'm looking for is complete manual controls. I would rather have it completely manual, without autofocus and such. My price ceiling is somewhere around $350 new or used. My friend recommended a Nikon FM10, what do you think about them? Any better ideas?
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Messages:
    2,117
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    Tottenville, Staten Island, NYC USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Many manufacturers sold fine manual 35mm SLRs. They are available at low prices now. Brands such as Pentax, Canon, Nikon, Minolta and Konica come to mind. Lots of lenses are available for all of them. You'll probably also want a good exposure meter, as the ones on the older rigs don't always age gracefully.
     
  3. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2004
    Messages:
    454
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    I think there are much better options than an FM-10 for that budget. You could probably get a Nikon F3 with a 50mm lens for that if you watch eBay, definitely FM2n and FE2 should be easy as well. If you wanted to go Pentax, you could get a KX or MX. All of the above are outstanding cameras. The FM10 is not manufactured by Nikon, and I doubt it would last anywhere near as long as any of the above. I think used is definitely the way to go, both because older stuff (70's and 80's) tends to be better made and also because that was the manual focus era so those cameras lend themselves better to manual photography.

    Dave
     
  4. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Berkeley
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Pentax MX is a good fully manual camera, and at least my light meter has aged well...its much older then me and still works :)
     
  5. JDP

    JDP TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Completely manual for $350? That's pretty easy these days. For $100 I picked up a Mamiya DLT1000 from 1968 and it came with a 50mm f/1.4, 90-230mm, flash, extension tubes, filters, and a nice hard padded case to keep it all together. Tack on $160 to get it cleaned, lubricated and adjusted and it's good as new. Or, well, I hope it will be - I'll find out in 3 weeks.
     
  6. JEazy

    JEazy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 22, 2006
    Messages:
    388
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just bought a used 35mm Nikon N90s SLR w/vertical grip for $140 from bhphotovideo.com. look around at there used section, they have some great deals.
     
  7. Luke_H

    Luke_H TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2006
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ames, Iowa
    My opinion, because I have this setup and love it:

    A Nikon N80 and Nikon's 50mm f1.8 AF/D lens.

    It should run you about 250.00 for a used camera body in like-new condition along with a new lens.

    You have full manual controls with shutter speeds up to 30 seconds.

    You have full auto controls.

    It's basically the new D80 digital camera except it uses film.

    The ergonomics agree with my hands moreso than the older N90 camera.

    This way you can use the camera for class, in manual mode, and then when you're not in the mood to waste time composing, you can use shutter or aperture priority.

    The N80 has a screw hole in the shutter button for cable release, which I have used several times. Other plusses are the gridlines in the viewfinder along with a lighted LCD panel and lighted gridlines at night.
     
  8. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Berkeley
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    as far as i knew, fully manual control meant (at least on SLR's) that the shutter and aperature were operated by a hand wound spring. IE the action of the shutter curtin is achieved by a manual action and not a magnetic system or other electrical device...but i could be wrong...
     
  9. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Delavan, Wisconsin, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I picked up a Nikon FM2n from Cameta. Full manual control. I does have a light meter that takes a battery but the camera will work without the battery just not meter. Built like a tank and will use all the modern AF lenses except the "G" series.
     
  10. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    2,484
    Likes Received:
    0
    The FM2n is a great camera - flash sync speeds up to 1/250, shoots at all speeds without battery etc - but on the other hand it is significantly more expensive than other manual SLRs, and that money could instead be spend buying some quality glass instead. If you're planning to use a fully manual film camera a lot, for many years to come, then by all means go for something like an FM2n (or even an F3), or a similarly high-spec camera from another company like an Olympus OM3ti, Pentax LX or Canon F1. A camera like one of those in good condition will be an investment. It'll keep going forever and yet you'll be willing to pay to have it serviced anyway; it'll be tough enough to bounce off walls and at the same time you'll probably want to stop it from getting a scratch. On the other hand that may not be what you're looking for. If you just want a manual camera to experiment or learn with, or as a backup, you might be better going for something cheaper, like the FM10, FE10 or FG, the aforementioned Pentax MX, Pentax P30, Canon T60 or one of the Minolta SRT or XD series. They may not be as durable, but unless you habitually drop cameras from great heights that's unlikely to be a problem; they're still fairly sturdy for general use, even those partially made from the dreaded plastic. The real question is whether you'll miss things like high flash-sync speeds, shutter speeds over 1/1000 or 1/2000, or shooting without batteries (after all it's not hard to carry spares around). If not, you can get a nice lens or two with the money you saved, and still have manual control over exposure and focus.
     
  11. airgunr

    airgunr TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    846
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Delavan, Wisconsin, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Very good points and suggestions.

    I think one of the things I like about the Nikons (not specifically the FM2n) is the lens compatabilities from the old manual cameras up to the newest digitals. I've got almost all Auto Focus lenses and all but the "G" series will work just fine on the manual as well as give me full fuctionality on my modern do everything cameras.

    Some of the other systems like the Canons in particular don't have the backward/forward compatibilities so you have to have different lenses for each.

    Just a point to keep in mind along with all the other factors to consider when selecting a camera and/or system.
     
  12. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,479
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    That's one of the things I also like about Pentax--almost all of their lenses will fit their modern cameras. The K1000 is built like a tank, too, which makes it awesome to use. It's a sense of power:lol:
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

mamiya dlt1000