Can anyone tell me what this instrument is?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Nicodemus, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello. As mentioned in an earlier thread, I have a metal cable-thing that was in the bag with my Minolta 7000 Maxxum when I got it used. I thought it was a cable to trip the shutter with the camera on a tripod, but I can find no way to attach it to the camera, and the instrument does not appear in the manual. It is flexible, and when you press on one end, a small metal tip comes out the other. Here are two pictures of it. Can anyone tell me what this is? Thanks.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. paul rond

    paul rond TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    That looks like a cable release. I can't see the threaded tip but there should be some at the end, if not it may be broken or a different mount. It should screw right into the shutter release buttons' center, you'll see some threads there. Take a pic of the very tip? and another of your shutter button on the camera?... let's see?
     
  3. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Messages:
    6,217
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    London
    It's definately an SLR cable-release!
     
  4. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, thanks for confirming my suspicions. I guess it's release that doesn't go with my camera! I can't imagine why I have it, though. Here's a close-up of the tip, and a picture of the shutter release on the camera. It is a threaded tip, but I can't see anywhere to screw it in. The cable-release listed in the accessories of the manual looks entirely different. Thanks for your help.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Jess

    Jess TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2005
    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    We posted simultaneously, so I'm editing all that out. You may need a bracket to attach to the camera, to then attach the release so the trigger slips through the bracket and hits your release button. I can't even figure out which of those buttons is your release, but if you have a bracket too, maybe that's why the release was with the kit.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the tip. I haven't found a bracket yet, but I'll keep looking. This is the release button:
    [​IMG]
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The cable release you posted a picture of is the standard model that has worked wonderfully with thousands of cameras for many decades now. It's cheap and readily available, and does a great job.

    Of course, in their wisdom many of the manufacturers of modern AF 35mm SLRs (maybe some DSLRs too?) have decided to leave a cable release socket off of their entry level cameras, or use a proprietary cable release socket that forces you to buy their expensive name brand cable release, which still does the same thing as the old school $10 cable release.

    Since your manual says there is a cable release available at least you're not S.O.L. (as many entry level Nikon purchasers have discovered). Look on the other side of the lens than the side you have pictured. That's often where the proprietary cable release socket is; if it's not there check the manual. It's also possible that your camera uses a remote shutter release.

    As mentioned above, you can get a device that straps around your camera with velcro, and adds a button with standard cable release threads that sits above your existing shutter release. These have always seemed sort of a pain in the butt to me, and the ones I've seen are a lot more expensive than a strap of velcro and a plastic button seems like it should cost.

    Are you looking to do long exposures, or only trigger the exposure without touching your camera? If it's the latter you can use the self timer.
     
  8. walter23

    walter23 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    489
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    A pacific island (canada)
    That, my friend, is an orifice-buddy.
     
  9. paul rond

    paul rond TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Many of the newer electronic cameras require an electronit cable release. That is an old style mecanical cable release.

    That bracket is a nice adaptation for this.
     
  10. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2003
    Messages:
    562
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Xenia, OH
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    :lmao:
    :lmao:
     
  11. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm trying to do long-exposures, and my camera won't allow me to use the self timer for them :grumpy: .
    This is indeed the case; the manual shows an electronic cable release. I can't imagine how I ended up with this mechanical one, though. Thanks for your help everyone; I'll go get the RIGHT one for my camera!
     

Share This Page