Can I Coax Anyone Into...

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by sween, Apr 24, 2009.

  1. sween

    sween TPF Noob!

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    ...discussing flash brackets? Seems we've done this dance before, but I'm hoping for some input on two things:


    • What bracket for a D200 and SB800?
    • Do I really need a flash bracket, will I see any difference?
    And maybe if you feel like it, help me spend a small amount of money. I have a gift card worth $150 to B&H and honestly don't know what to do with it. Sooooo, if you're of a mind, hop on in here. Thanks a million!
     
  2. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

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    A long time ago I used to use a flash bracket. Strobaframe quickflip. But now a days I just use my flash in bounce mode or with a diffusion dome on it. With tilting and swiveling heads on flashes now a days. A bracket is no longer a necessity.

    As for the gift card, what do you have now. And what are your photographic interests?
     
  3. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I have a bracket, a Stroboframe Press-T. It's design lets you hold the camera with both hands, like you would if the bracket wasn't there.

    A bracket is great if you are constantly having to shoot your flash directly. It keeps the flash above the lens in portrait orientation so you can avoid side shadows. It also keeps the flash a little higher, helping to avoid red eye.

    Like Ben, I don't use my bracket as much as I used to...and prefer to bounce instead. One thing that was an issue for me, was the size of the combined camera, bracket and flash...it was big enough to be awkward for a fast moving wedding.

    Don't forget that if you go with a bracket, you may need an off-shoe cord to connect the flash & camera together. That's another $50-$60.
     
  5. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    I use one if I am shooting outdoors, and am using the flash as fill. Like Mr. Big said, it helps raise the flash above the camera to avoid red eye, and with most of them, you can flip the camera in the bracket to maintain flash orientation to avoid side shadows. Be careful, though...if your subject has deep inset eye sockets, the raised flash can accentuate the shadow rather than fill it. Indoors, I'd rather just leave it on camera and bounce.

    I also use it almost all the time for macro work as well....
    [​IMG]

    Yes...that is foil wrapped around a Fong diffuser...:D. Works great to keep the light where I want it.
     
  6. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The whole issue of bouncing the flash was the reason I went with the bracket I listed. It is one of the few brackets that allow you to keep the flash in the proper orientation whether you are shooting in landscape or portrait orientation and still bounce the flash.
     
  7. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    I can still bounce with my bracket, but if I'm going to, I'd rather reduce my weight load and put the flash back on the camera. If I know I am going to be doing a lot of portrait orientation, then I flip it in the bracket. Most of the time, though, I will shoot horizontal, and crop portrait if required.
     
  8. sween

    sween TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for all the input. Frankly, after what's been said, I seriously don't think I need a bracket. It kind of looks like all it would do is give me more weight and bulk to haul around. With my present flash and diffuser, it's more than adequate.
     
  9. sween

    sween TPF Noob!

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    I really don't need anything. What I might want would cost far beyond that $150.
     
  10. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    In the 70s when it was hard to get the camera farther off axis to reduce red-eye and when one did not care about the flat boring lighting, a bracket was cool. Today, with CLS, wireless triggers and what not, brackets have gone the wayside of the road because getting the flash OFF the camera s proven to give consistently much superior photographic results.

    For me, in my tests, on camera flash and a flash on a bracket 1 foot above the camera give visually identical results and reduce red-eye about 25% at best. The shot is always FLAT lit and boring in this manner. On top of that, manufacturers charge $50 for a piece of metal with a hinge or something as ludicrous as $350 or more for something that holds the flash in one position and lets you rotate the camera... for meager increases in lighting effectiveness! Even just bouncing the light or using something like a better bounce card makes a huge improvement and doesn't involve me spending hundreds of dollars to do.

    A D200 and SB-800.. with these tools, using CLS will give you results WAY better than any bracket.. and they are FREE! :)
     
  11. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    ^^agreed, just pop up your on board flash and put the SB in slave. Camera in right hand, flash in left, no wires, no clunky cheesy brackets, it just works, and in full TTL!
     
  12. Phranquey

    Phranquey TPF Noob!

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    Hmmm....I do occasionally miss my D70s for this reason.

    The bracket may be an antiquated piece, but it works great for me while doing hand-held macro. It allows me to hang the flash out over the subject, and gives me a second grip for much steadier control.
     

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